Tag Archives: relationships

Grandma Was Right After All!

Grandma Was Right after All!: Practical Parenting Wisdom from the Good Old DaysTitle: Grandma Was Right After All!
Author: John Rosemond
Publisher: Tyndale House Publishers
ISBN: 978-1-4964-0591-3

“Were you easier to discipline than your kids are? Why? What is it that your parents did that made their parenting experience so much less fraught with stress?” John Rosemond asks in his book, Grandma Was Right After All!

This two hundred and forty page paperback targets parents trying to raise their children by using practical wisdom from the past. Using mainly the New King James Version of the Holy Bible, the NIV and ESV are mentioned. After an introduction, twenty-four chapters focus on child rearing, ending with a conclusion and the author’s biography.

Having grown up in the 1950s, the writer sees a distinct difference between children raised before the 1960s compared to afterwards. The twenty-one-year-old in 1970 that accepted responsibility was projected to be twenty-eight years old in maturity in 2010. Times have changed, and Rosemond believes if parents returned to they way Grandma disciplined, our children would become well-behaved, respectful, humble, and mature.

Using two dozen sayings from the pre-1960s, each is discussed and interpreted of how it has changed or been ignored when teaching our children right or wrong regarding motivation, respect, frugality, peer pressure, etc.

Today parents tend to believe children deserve reasons and explanations when in the past the “because I said so” diffused the questioning. Boundaries were established, consequences were given, humility was taught, and perseverance was promoted. In society today, children are less apt to learn valuable lessons the hard way, entitlement is unacceptable, high self-esteem creates idols, and being grateful turns negatives into positives.

Often blending his personal upbringing of being raised by single parent and later a step-father, along with a juvenile arrest, the author shows the many valid truths to child rearing techniques before the 60s. The chapters add short correlations to the Bible with written out verses, ending with questions to ponder on raising children.

Without being overly preachy or dictatorial, the book establishes the contrasts between post-modern and current day psychological parenting. Although parents were not perfect back then and had different issues, it may be something to consider when raising children today.

As a psychologist who directed several mental health programs for children, author Rosemond has written multiple best-selling parenting books. He and his wife of forty years have two children and a grandchild.

Thanks to Tyndale House Publishers, Inc. for furnishing this complimentary book in exchange for a review based on the reader’s opinions.

This review will be posted on Tyndale, DeeperShopping, and Amazon with links on Bookfun.org, Godinterest, Pinterest, LinkedIn, and Twitter.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Filed under **** Good - Will Be Glad to Pass On to Others, Christian

Letters from My Father’s Murderer

Letters from My Father's Murderer: A Journey of ForgivenessTitle: Letters from My Father’s Murderer
Author: Laurie A. Coombs
Publisher: Kregel Publications
ISBN: 978-0-8254-4229-2

“The girl who had been motivated by anger and vengeance, who wanted to go into that prison to inflict further pain and suffering, was now replaced with a woman whose sole desire was to follow God and bring good,” Laurie A. Coombs admits in her book, Letters from My Father’s Murderer: A Journey of Forgiveness.

At two hundred and thirty-two pages, this paperback targets those interested in concentrating on God while dealing with the heartbreak of a parent being murdered. With some profanity, topics regarding adultery, murder, and death may not be appropriate for immature readers. The English Standard and New King James versions of the Holy Bible are referenced.

Losing a parent is devastating; losing one due to a senseless murder is unfathomable. When the author was in college, she learned her father had been killed and could not grasp why the incident happened.

After Anthony was convicted and sent to life in prison, ten years later the young woman who was married with children could not move on from the past. Having walked away from God at age fifteen, it took irritability, depression, and panic attacks to bring her to her knees to the Almighty.

As her journey of healing began, she felt led of the Holy Spirit to face her demons and contact Anthony to resolve her fears and frustrations. Not wanting to forgive him for the past that altered her future, Coombs began corresponding with a man that was scared to admit his feelings of guilt, remorse, and shame.

While God did not allow visitation between the two initial enemies, He did bring both to understand the tragic pitfalls of an inappropriate relationship that led to one man’s death.

What they did not expect was the transformation of learning true forgiveness, how to love your enemies, purging oneself of bitterness and blame-shifting, and obtaining joy and freedom through reconciliation by knowing God’s grace, mercy, and power.

This tear-jerker collection of letters sent back and forth between two deeply broken individuals solidifies how God uses those He loves for redemption and purpose, having us realize we all are in need of the Savior.

Author Coombs is dedicated to writing and speaking on issues of forgiveness, redemption, and the hope through Jesus Christ. She, her husband, and children live in Nevada.

Thanks to The Book Club Network Inc. for furnishing a complimentary book in exchange for the reader’s honest opinion.

This review will be posted on The Book Club Network, DeeperShopping, and Amazon with links on Bookfun.org, Godinterest, Pinterest, LinkedIn, Twitter, Google+, and Facebook.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Filed under ***** Great - A Keeper, If You Borrow It, Give It Back!, Biography, Christian

Untangled

Untangled: Let God Loosen the Knots of Insecurity in Your LifeTitle: Untangled
Author: Carey Scott
Publisher: Revell
ISBN: 978-0-8007-2659-1

“He loves you right now, right here in your tangled mess – your stumbles, falls, and all. And there is nothing you can do to make God love you more or less. Your tangles don’t intimidate him. They don’t scare him off,” Carey Scott reiterates in her book, Untangled: Let God Loosen the Knots of Insecurity in Your Life.

This two hundred and twenty-four-page paperback targets Christian women seeking ways to overcoming feelings of inadequacy and worthlessness. After acknowledgments and an introduction, ten chapters discuss the topic of insecurity. The end of the book includes an epilogue by the author’s husband, notes, author’s biography, and advertisements. This reader wishes all pronouns of God were capitalized for reverence.

Having been molested as a four-year-old child, the author grew into adulthood always believing she was never good enough, constantly comparing her worth to others. Like the majority of women, she was an admitted chronic approval junkie whose self-expectations were based on the world’s scale, not God’s.

Believing she would never be worth anything, she embarked on a journey to untie the tangles of shame, guilt, expectations, control, and insignificant feelings. What she found and is promoting ardently is that God loves each of us unfathomably, no matter what we have done or will do.

Not dwelling too much on her experiences, the chapters consider Biblical foundations by using characters such as Eve believing she needed to become better and Rachel and Leah’s competitions for love, as well as the insecurities of Hannah, Elizabeth, Saul and Moses. With shame being the main culprit of not feeling good enough, it is triggered by not living up to one’s expectations, another’s standards, or by circumstances.

Ranging from the expectations of women and in their marriage, also discussed are the struggles of significance in raising children, maintaining a clean home, having quality friendships, avoiding self-promotion on social media, dealing with employment successes and failures, and striving for giftedness. To become untangled in our self-degradation and feeling of inadequacies, we must simply ask Jesus for guidance, support, and direction.

This is an ideal book for women who feel they do not think they are good enough to be a wife, mother, daughter, friend, or employee and worthlessness has tangled their personality.

Author, speaker, and certified Bible life coach, Scott empowers women to be real and feel worthy. Her husband and she have two children and live in Colorado.

Thanks to Revell for furnishing this complimentary book in exchange for a review based on the reader’s honest opinions.

This review will be posted on Baker Publishing, DeeperShopping, and Amazon with links on Bookfun.org, Godinterest, Pinterest, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Filed under **** Good - Will Be Glad to Pass On to Others, Christian, Home / Garden / Food

Battle of the Grandmas

Battle of the GrandmasTitle: Battle of the Grandmas
Author: Anthonette Klinkerman
Illustrator: Justin Acquavella
Publisher: Overhead Projections, LLC
ISBN: 978-0-9905999-0-6

“That’s it! I’ve had it! I can’t play with all this stuff, or even try to wear it. It would make me much happier to find someone to share it. I don’t want the presents, toys or sweet candy; I only want my grandmas to spend time with me,” the little girl explains in Anthonette Klinkerman’s children’s book, Battle of the Grandmas.

Having received a Reader’s Favorite Book Award, this numbered thirty-four page paperback with a glossy cover targets children ages three to eight years old who enjoy stories about grandmothers and sharing. With no scary or violent scenes, it would best be read out loud to beginner readers due to some complicated wording.

Living in Colorado, author Klinkerman is a public school teacher and public speaker, teaching English at night school for at-risk teens. Based on a true story, this is her second published book. Illustrator Acquavella is a high school senior as well as an independent artist and graphic designer. His colorful designs show emotions with cartoonish details. The black words are against a light green background on the left side of the page while all artwork is on the right side.

In this short tale told in rhyming format, a little girl has three grandmothers who love her dearly. As they shower their granddaughter with gifts, they overdo their giving by competing to give the best present instead of spending quality time with her.

When the child finally puts her foot down and states she would rather have them spend time with her by taking her to the park, reading a book, or having fun, they realize their errors. The presents are happily given away, and the girl is contented getting to know each one.

By not only teaching a young one to understand quality relationships instead of the quantity of gifts received, but the book also promotes sharing and giving others things no longer needed or wanted. This is a thoughtful gift for any child, especially if the adult has the opportunity to discuss the pitfalls of materialism and the joys of giving and loving others.

Thanks to Bookpleasures and the author for furnishing this complimentary book in exchange for a review based on the reader’s honest opinions.

This review will be posted on Bookpleasures and Amazon with links on Bookfun.org, Godinterest, Pinterest, and LinkedIn.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Filed under **** Good - Will Be Glad to Pass On to Others, Childrens

Mercy’s Rain

Mercy's Rain: An Appalachian NovelTitle: Mercy’s Rain: An Appalachian Novel
Author: Cindy K. Sproles
Publisher: Kregel Publications
ISBN: 978-0-8254-4361-9
Page Count: 264

Quote ~ “Get this. You can’t help me. Nobody can help me. Because of him, I’ve become the very thing I hated most. Thanks to the Pastor, I’ll burn in hell. I think I’ve had enough help from men of God.”

Audience ~ The paperback targets those who enjoy Christian fiction involving broken family relationships and light romance. Using words like hell and slang, its topics of abuse, incest, and murder may not be appropriate for immature readers.

Contents ~ After two pages of accolades, the forty-two chapter story ends with acknowledgments. The King James Version of the Bible is referenced.

Author ~ Having written four non-fiction book, Sproles is an author, writers conference teacher, and speaker.

Characters ~ The central character is nineteen-year-old Mercy Roller, a broken girl who has an abusive father everyone, including her, calls Pastor. Leaving her best friend, Maddie, behind, she meets another preacher and a family that shows her what real love is.

Description ~ Mercy never understood why she was given such a name being raised by an evil man of the cloth who beat, abused, and raped her in the mountains of Tennessee in the nineteenth century. At age seven, she witnessed her father murdering a drunk woman; by thirteen, she became a widow, and her baby was killed during childbirth.

Angry and bitter, she plays a pivotal part in the death of the Pastor, thinking it was the only way to stop her father’s madness. Afraid she has become like him, she wallows in guilt, shame, and hopelessness.

After her mother evicts her from their home, Mercy ends up on the other side of the mountain emotionally and spiritually stripped naked. With the help of a loving preacher with hurts of his own, she begs to hear God speak to her. When He remains silent, she must learn to love and forgive others and herself.

Pros ~ Focusing that only God can wash away the painful past, the heartbreaking tale shows His love and mercy in dire situations. Only when a person is repentant does he or she find salvation, trust, and peace through God.

Cons ~ The disgusting portrayal of a girl being physically, mentally, and spiritually abused is graphic and emotional. Readers may find the story written in first person too raw with hatred toward others and self.

Opinion ~ Riveting in story and emotional turmoil, Sproles shows how bitterness and guilt festers and grows within us. Only by the grace of God, does the protagonist understand she is forgiven so she can forgive others.

Rating ~ 4.5 of 5 stars

Appreciation ~ Thanks to Kregel Publications for furnishing this complimentary book in exchange for a review based on the reader’s honest opinion.

This review will be posted on DeeperShopping and Amazon with links on Bookfun.org, Godinterest, Pinterest, and LinkedIn.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Filed under **** Good - Will Be Glad to Pass On to Others, Christian, Fiction

Answering Your Kids’ Toughest Questions

Title: Answering Your Kids’ Toughest Questions
Authors: Elyse Fitzpatrick & Jessica Thompson
Publisher: Bethany House
ISBN: 978-0-7642-1187-4

“We strive to teach our children to know what it says and teach them all about the good news of the Rescuer who calls himself the truth (John 14:6), and then we rest and pray and wait for the good, ‘imperishable’ seed to take root and grow,” Elyse Fitzpatrick and Jessica Thompson write about the Bible in their book, Answering Your Kids’ Toughest Questions: Helping Them Understand Loss, Sin, Tragedies, and Other Hard Topics.

This one hundred and seventy-six page paperback targets parents of young children who are asking complex, hard-to-understand questions about life, loss, and the Bible. Using the English Standard Version of the Bible, the RSV is also referenced. This reader wishes all pronouns of God were capitalized for reverence.

Written mainly from Jessica’s perspective with her mother, Elyse’s input, the authors state up front it is not a conclusive, “know-all-the-answers” book to use to help children understand life; it is a discussion of many topics kids ponder and how best to approach the subjects based on their ages.

After an introduction, ten chapters examine different areas of hardships, tragedies, and Christian beliefs that preschool to preteens may question, ending with recommended resources for further studies, acknowledgements, notes, and authors’ biographies.

Each chapter begins with basic theological explanations including Bible verses and offers example discussions to start talking to young ones. There are specific age group divisions of preschool, five to ten year olds, and eleven and older so that the parent can best chose what works for the child’s maturity level.

Topics include what is sin, why people die, who is Satan, what is hell, why do couples get divorced, difficult Bible stories to comprehend, sexual sins, and natural disasters, ending with the Good News that Jesus is the complete answer.

Backing up beliefs regarding suicide, demons, adultery, doubt, homosexuality, sex abuse, pornography, violence, war, and terrorism using the Word of God, this is a solid focal point to understand how to answer children’s tough and sometimes heartbreaking questions.

Promoting that the parent should know his or her child’s personality and comprehension, the writers reiterate that this is not a line-by-line conversation; it is a spark that sets the parent’s mind at ease when confronting or explaining a situation.

Through praying and being in the Word, parents may find the additional reading sources for Bible study, doctrine, and chapter themes helpful as they encourage and mentor their loved ones.

Thanks to Bethany House for furnishing this complimentary book in exchange for a review based on the reader’s honest opinions.

 

This review will be posted on DeeperShopping and Amazon with links on Bookfun.org, LinkedIn, and Pinterest.

 

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Filed under **** Good - Will Be Glad to Pass On to Others, Christian, Non-Fiction

Passing Strangers

Title: Passing Strangers
Author: Angela Hunt
Publisher: Hunt Haven Press
ISBN: 9780692230206

“She choked on the word, because Matt and Andie weren’t strangers any more. They had become friends – good friends – in the time they’d spent together. Bonded by chance and liberated by the assumption that they’d never meet again, they’d been more honest with each other than with most of the people they saw every day,” Angela Hunt writes about three train travelers in her novel, Passing Strangers.

At three hundred and fifty pages, this paperback targets those that like contemporary Christian fiction involving relationships. With a few slang words and no sex scenes or violence, the topics of physical and emotional abuse may not be appropriate for immature readers. The ending includes acknowledgements, discussion questions, and author’s biography along with a list of her written books.

In this current-day story taking place mainly on a train ride from Washington D.C. to Florida, lives intersect as each makes life-changing decisions. There is Andie Crystal, a thirty-year old woman forced to take a vacation as she hides her past as part of the famous televised family that sings and performs. Recently widowed Matthew Scofield cannot handle his two young children and be a successful lawyer at the same time so is en route to his mother’s house to rectify the problem. With a black eye and a broken heart, middle-aged Janette Turlington cannot decide if she should leave permanently or return as wife and mother in Arkansas.

As they each embark on the ten day trip via the rails, the trio with kids in tow ramble through the historic towns of Williamsburg, Charleston, Savannah, Jacksonville, and St. Augustine to reach personal destinations that will change lives.

While the loners crave human connection, Andie, Matthew, and Janette become familiar as they struggle to find their purpose on earth. Having divorced herself from any personal or professional attachment to her family, Andie questions the last eleven years when she learns her mother is terminally ill. Matthew, still unable to grieve for his deceased wife, wonders what kind of single parent he can be to his two kids he barely knows. Having left without telling her husband, Janette ponders what life would be without those she loves.

Written as three congruous books of train traveling through lives that are tossed and jostled along with stops and starts, Hunt gathers unexpected souls that unknowingly help each other as they depend on their new-found track of friends.

Thanks to The Book Club Network Inc. for furnishing this complimentary book in exchange for a review based on the reader’s honest opinions.

 

This review will be posted on TBCNI, DeeperShopping, Bookpleasures, and Amazon with links on BookFun.org, Pinterest, and LinkedIn.

 

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Filed under **** Good - Will Be Glad to Pass On to Others, Christian, Fiction

Leota’s Garden

Title: Leota’s Garden
Author: Francine Rivers
Publisher: Tyndale House Publishers, Inc.
ISBN: 978-1-4143-7065-1

Maintaining a beautiful garden takes a lot of hard work, constant attention and habitual care. But when left unattended and dejected, it quickly turns to ruins, just like damaged personal relationships. In Francine Rivers’s novel, Leota’s Garden, family generations of hurt, pain, reconciliation and acceptance are felt through the lives of several broken individuals.

At four hundred and fifty-six pages, this paperback book has a photograph of a lovely young woman holding a basket of colorful flowers on the front cover. With no profanity or uncomfortable scenes except dealing with the potential loss of a loved one, it is geared toward Christian women of all ages. Inside there are over a dozen discussion questions for book club reading at the end of the book along with a list of other written books by this best-selling author.

Eighty-four year old Leota is alone in the world, feeling unloved, unneeded and praying to die. She sits day after day in the small house her in-laws gave to her long-deceased husband after the war, staring out the dirty windows at her once-beautiful victory garden that brought her so much joy and comfort. But that was so long ago, where painful memories and long-lasting regrets started but never ended. Like the overgrown and forgotten yard, so are the unattended and uncultivated relationships with her hateful, self-absorbed daughter and her too-busy, preoccupied son.

When her granddaughter, Annie, decides to get away from her mother’s protective, dominating wings, the young girl yearns to learn more about her grandmother and her unexplained past. Afraid of becoming like her own odious mother, she ponders why the one who gave birth to her detests anything to do with her own childhood upbringing, including the once-well-cared-for attractive garden.

With the help of a volunteer college student with his own ulterior motives and personal issues, Annie asks Leota if they can clean up and restore the garden. Through the cutting back, taming, clearing out and refining, Annie not only learns about the garden’s history, but more about her grandmother and why she continues to suffer the silence of her heart-breaking past.

Trusting the Lord to restore the tattered relationships of the three generations of women, Leota and Annie pray constantly to heal the heartache of misunderstanding and rejection as their deep love and acceptance of each other are brought to fruition.

Not living in a perfect world with perfect families, this sorrowful but tender tome softly reminds the reader to cherish any sprout, blossom or bouquet gleaned tending, restoring and resurrecting our own precious yet strained relationships.

This book was received by Tyndale for review purposes.

This review will be posted on http://www.tyndale.com, http://www.bookpleasures.com, http://www.amazon.com and linked on Pinterest and LinkedIn.

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Filed under **** Good - Will Be Glad to Pass On to Others, Christian, Fiction