Tag Archives: pirates

A Flag for the Flying Dragon

A Flag for the Flying Dragon: A Captain No Beard StoryTitle: A Flag for the Flying Dragon
Author: Carole P. Roman
Publisher: CreateSpace
ISBN: 978-1-5078-2692-8

“It was not what he planned for the flag. He studied his troubled crew and decided that it didn’t matter. As long as they were together, working, playing, and having fun, nothing else mattered,” Captain No Beard admits in Carole P. Roman children’s story, A Flag for the Flying Dragon.

Part of the “A Captain No Beard Story” series, this forty-six-page paperback targets preschool to early elementary school children, especially those who like pirate stories. With no profanity, scary scenes, or violence, the book would best be read out loud to beginner readers based on some of the complicated wording. The fun, colorful illustrations are easy to decipher and cover the complete page with a nicely sized black font text usually set against white backgrounds.

Award-winning author Roman has written over two dozen children’s books. A former teacher turned businesswoman, she spends time being a grandmother in New York while helping her husband run a successful family business.

This continuing tale has Captain No Beard in command of The Flying Dragon but at a quandary as he cannot find the perfect flag for his boat. The crew keeps busy doing their chores; only newcomer Zachary has nothing to do.

When the toddler tries to help Mongo be a lookout, the trouble starts. Afraid the little boy may get hurt, Captain No Beard struggles to find a viable task for him. Zach tries to help Cayla stuff holes, but that does not work. He offers to help Matie crack coconuts, but he makes a mess. Hallie is concerned her mopping the deck may be disrupted.

With Zach ruining the crew’s responsibilities, the captain has to come up with something quick. Seeing one of Cayla’s burp cloths, he turns it into the ship’s flag and instructs Zach to keep it safe and raise it every time they sail. In the end, everyone is happy that they worked together as a team and included Zach in the process. Soon they are transported back to reality in Alexander’s bedroom.

Playful and charming, this additional book offers readers a fantasy of fun while looking at the creative, expressive designs promoting working as a team and helping others.

Thanks to the author for furnishing this complimentary book in exchange for a review based on the reader’s honest opinion.

This review will be posted on Amazon with links on Bookfun.org, Godinterest, Pinterest, and LinkedIn.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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The Treasure of Snake Island

Title: The Treasure of Snake Island
Author: Carole P. Roman
Publisher: CreateSpace
ISBN: 978-1482390971

“There is a book in here for each one of us. Oh Alexander, give me that one. I love reading about snakes!” Hallie exclaims in Carole P. Roman’s children’s story, The Treasure of Snake Island.

Fifth in “A Captain No Beard Story” series, this thirty-eight page square paperback is targeted toward preschool to early elementary school children and readers who like pirate stories. With no profanity, scary scenes, or violence, the book would best be read to beginner readers based on some of the more complicated words and lengthy reading. The fun, colorful illustrations are easy to decipher and cover one side of the page with a nicely sized font wording on the other.

This enchanting tome involves a boy named Alexander, his cousin, Hallie, and his little sister, Cayla, who pretend they are on their pirate ship called The Flying Dragon. In this adventure, the crew notices the beautiful sunrise when Polly the parrot mentions the saying, “Red skies at night, sailors delight; red skies at morning, sailors take warning.” Hearing the rhyme, a few of them become frightened of a possible storm that eventually blows over.

Wondering where the saying comes from, Mongo the monkey, Fribbet the frog, and the others are told by Polly that she learned it by reading books. The bird explains books are wonderful, containing information on almost any topic, even snakes that Hallie does not like.

Captain No Beard, aka Alexander, switches the subject by telling the crew there is buried treasure at nearby Snake Island. Using a map, he sails the ship to the island and the pirates disembark. All pitch in and dig where “X” marks the spot to uncover a trunk. When the chest is opened, Alexander, Hallie, and Cayla are transported back to his bedroom, finding inside a plethora of books for each of them.

Charming and entertaining, the book offers a fantasy of fun while teaching teamwork, friendship, and cooperation along with learning a few nautical terms. Children will enjoy looking at the colorful, expressive designs as they experience the value of reading books.

Thanks to the author for furnishing this book in exchange for a review based on the reader’s honest opinion.

This review will be posted on Bookpleasures and Amazon with links on LinkedIn and Pinterest.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Filed under ***** Great - A Keeper, If You Borrow It, Give It Back!, Childrens, Fiction

Strangers on the High Seas

Strangers On The High SeasTitle: Strangers on the High Seas
Author: Carole P. Roman
Publisher: CreateSpace
ISBN: 978-1480177222

“I can’t take my eyes off you because you’re such a baby! You don’t know the first thing about being on a ship,” Captain No Beard reprimands Cayla in Carole P. Roman’s children’s story, Strangers on the High Seas.

Part of “A Captain No Beard Story” series, this thirty-two page square paperback is targeted toward preschool to early elementary school children and readers who like pirate stories. With no profanity, scary scenes, or violence, the book would best be read to beginner readers based on some of the more complicated words and lengthy reading. The fun, colorful illustrations are easy to decipher and cover one side of the page with a nicely sized font wording on the other.

This continuing tome includes a boy named Alexander and his cousin, Hallie, who pretend they are on their pirate ship called The Flying Dragon. This time a new crew member is onboard: Cabin Girl Cayla, a baby whom Alexander must keep an eye on, even on his ship.

When the crew is out to sea, Mongo the monkey spies a dark ship on the horizon. Captain No Beard and Hallie have never seen the boat before, but Polly the parrot knows the boat is The Shark Bait, captained by Barnabas, the scurvy dog. Linus the lion pipes in the first mate is Crab Cakes as the boat gets closer.

Knowing not to talk to strangers or approach animals without permission, Captain No Beard decides to speed away. With the crew’s help, especially Cayla’s, The Shark Bait cannot catch them due to a certain smell. Instantly transported back to his bedroom, Alexander calls his mom to report to the “poop” deck.

Although a rather strange ending about dirty diapers “saving the crew,” the book offers a fantasy of fun while teaching not to talk to strangers, being responsible for others, and learning a few nautical terms. Children will enjoy looking at the colorful, expressive designs, but they may avoid changing any diapers in the future.

Thanks to the author for furnishing this book in exchange for a review based on the reader’s honest opinion.

This review will be posted on Bookpleasures and Amazon with links on LinkedIn and Pinterest.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Stuck in the Doldrums – A Lesson in Sharing

Stuck in the DoldrumsTitle: Stuck in the Doldrums – A Lesson in Sharing
Author: Carole P. Roman
Publisher: CreateSpace
ISBN: 978-1479182701

“Just because you’re in charge doesn’t mean you know everything. A good captain must consider everyone’s feelings, or else nobody will want to be in your crew,” Captain No Beard admits in Carole P. Roman’s children’s story, Stuck in the Doldrums – A Lesson in Sharing.

Part of “A Captain No Beard Story” series, this thirty-six page square paperback is targeted toward preschool to early elementary school children and readers who like pirate stories. With no profanity, scary scenes, or violence, the book would best be read to beginner readers based on some of the more complicated words and lengthy reading. The fun, colorful illustrations are easy to decipher and cover one side of the page with a nicely sized font wording on the other.

This continuing cute tome includes a boy named Alexander and his cousin, Hallie, who pretend they are on their pirate ship called The Flying Dragon. When their ship experiences the calm seas and doldrums, the crew goes onshore to play in the sand. However, Captain No Beard becomes bossy and pushy, demanding Mongo the monkey to give him his telescope and wanting to change Linus the lion’s sand castle tower and drawbridge.

With the crew upset with his bossiness and negative attitude, the captain returns alone to the ship, convinced he does not need anyone. When a giant squid entangles the boat, Captain No Beard screams for help, but the crew questions if they should come to his rescue based on how he treated them.

Hallie explains that they are a crew first and they should always help a friend in need and talk after the crisis is over. They come aboard, getting the boat free of the giant squid. Captain No Beard apologizes for his bad behavior and thanks his crew for their help before he switches back to being Alexander in his bedroom.

Playful and charming, the book offers a fantasy of fun while teaching how to not be selfish, to share, and to help a friend who is going through a difficult situation in addition to learning a few nautical terms. Reminding readers to be kind, children will enjoy looking at the colorful, expressive designs and reading the tale again.

Thanks to the author for furnishing this book in exchange for a review based on the reader’s honest opinion.

This review will be posted on Bookpleasures and Amazon with links on Pinterest and LinkedIn.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Filed under ***** Great - A Keeper, If You Borrow It, Give It Back!, Childrens, Fiction

Captain No Beard

CNB_KIRKUS_LOGO.pngTitle: Captain No Beard
Author: Carole P. Roman
Publisher: CreateSpace
ISBN: 978-1478151708

“’Whew, that was close’ Captain No Beard said ‘Being a captain is hard work.’” Carole P. Roman writes in her children’s story, Captain No Beard – An Imaginary Tale of a Pirate’s Life.

First in “A Captain No Beard Story” series, this forty page square paperback is targeted toward preschool to early elementary school children and readers who like pirate stories. With no profanity, scary scenes, or violence, the book would best be read to beginner readers based on some of the more complicated words and lengthy reading. The fun, colorful illustrations are easy to decipher and cover the complete page with a nicely sized font wording.

In this cute make-believe tome, Captain No Beard truly has no hair on his chin as he commands his frigate, The Flying Dragon. His first mate, Hallie, is his cousin who is up to the challenge. Also on board are his stuffed animal friends: Mongo the monkey, Linus the lion, and Fribbit the frog, with an unnamed parrot that usually sits on the captain’s hat.

Being the captain on a ship is hard work and Captain No Beard tells his mates this often. When he is asked to explain what “Shiver me timbers” means and Hallie does not know, he must look it up in his the Pirate Dictionary, which means work.

When a storm comes and they have to scramble to close the hatches, again he mentions how it is hard work to be in charge. And when his cousin almost falls overboard and gets soaking wet, he saves the damsel, reminding all of his hard work.

However, when the whole crew becomes scared of the voice from the deep who is a mermaid asking what they are doing, Captain No Beard quickly explains they are looking for treasure. The second the mermaid flops on the ship’s deck, reality returns when his mother enters the boy’s bedroom. Giving the two treasures of cookies, his mother winks. Hallie offers him another treat but he is too full since being a captain is hard work.

Playful and charming, the book offers readers a fantasy of fun while looking at the creative, expressive designs. Kudos to the author for winning the Pinnacle Book Achievement Award for this imaginary tale.

Thanks to the author for furnishing this book in exchange for a review based on the reader’s honest opinion.

This review will be posted on Bookpleasures and Amazon with links on Bookfun.org, Pinterest, and LinkedIn.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors on this review.

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Filed under ***** Great - A Keeper, If You Borrow It, Give It Back!, Childrens, Fiction

Quest for the Lost Treasure

Quest for the Lost TreasureTitle: Quest for the Lost Treasure
Author: Gerry Gaston
Illustrator: Laura Livi
Publisher: Project A Publishing, LLC
ISBN: 978-1-481150453

“A band of pirates raided your village and looted your people’s precious treasures, taking the gold and jewels, and then sailed away on the big blue ocean. Armed with your courage and determination, you set out to track down the thieving pirates. And so begins your epic journey …” Gerry Gaston writes in his children’s book, Quest for the Lost Treasure.

Part of the “Choose Your Own Path” series, this over-sized, fifty-page paperback targets readers ages three to eight years old. With no scary scenes or profanity, the story may be best read out loud to beginner readers due to some complicated wording. Illustrator Livi’s colorful, easy-to-understand, and detailed designs cover entire pages with white font wording overlapping them. The last page includes the author and artist’s autobiographies with no promotions for future books.

In this pirate tale, “you,” the reader, has been following a pirate ship that has stolen treasures and buried them on an island. With each page turned, you make a choice to try to follow the pirates or find where the treasure chest is buried. By being told what page number to turn to next in a small scroll icon placed strategically on the pages, you can climb aboard a ship and go up a ladder or open a hatch that leads to a secret passage or follow the pirates ashore to the beach, a trail, or a slippery ledge. Paths lead up hills, through trees, and into a swamp but eventually take you into a dark cave where the jewels hidden.

With no wrong decision, each time the reader may choose a different sequence viewing the pages and selecting a different icon route, technically ending up with the same results again.

Trying to get children from constantly playing video games, the idea of an interactive storyline may impress young creative readers who do not mind jumping back and forth between the pages after selecting different options. The concept is unique, but it may be confusing to some young readers who will need someone to help them along the way. This book may not be ideal in e-book format as it would have to be configured to go up, down, and sideways on the selected pages.

Thanks to Bookpleasures and the author for furnishing this book in exchange for a review based on the reader’s opinions.

This review will be posted on Bookpleasures and Amazon with links of Bookfun, LinkedIn, and Pinterest.

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