Tag Archives: animals

Wandering Woolly

Wandering WoollyTitle: Wandering Woolly
Author/Illustrator: Andrea Gabriel
Publisher: Arbordale Publishing
ISBN: 978-1-62855-5677

“They touched her with their trunks and bellowed with happiness to have their Woolly back home again. Little Woolly tucked her head into her mama’s warm, furry legs. She was glad to be home!” Andrea Gabriel ends the story section of her children’s book, Wandering Woolly.

This thirty-two unnumbered page paperback with a thick folding jacket cover targets children ages four to eight years old who enjoy an educational story about mammoths. With no scary scenes except for an animal falling into a river and getting lost, it may be best read out loud by adults to beginner readers due to some complicated wording.

In this book that states the earth is over thirteen thousand years old, it begins with a story of a young mammoth named Woolly that wonders about the world around her. One day she sees a river where she wants to cool off. Deciding to go by herself, she wanders down by the icy water and falls into its rumbling, rolling waves. She tries to keep her trunk above the water as she calls out for her mama. She is tossed along and grabs hold of a log that quickly takes her past a sloth, hunting lion, bear, beaver, and humans.

Exhausted, she swims to safety when the current slows down and is desperate to go back home. With her feet, she senses her mother’s bellows from far away. Getting hungry, she wanders by a family of saber tooth cats. When she finally sees her mom and aunties, she rushes home to be with them.

The last four pages have more educational tools of learning activities for creative minds that involve theoretical ice age sequencing, the history of mammoths and elephants as well as the Clovis people, and several extinct ice age animals.

What makes this book fun is learning about mammoths and how they survived in the wild a long time ago. Any child will enjoy looking at the colorful pictures while following the story and learning which animals are now extinct.

Rating: 4 of 5 stars (Believing in creationism, the reviewer disagrees with the represented age of the earth).

An award-winning artist, Gabriel has been an illustrator of several children’s books for the past fifteen years. Having written a prior book, she living in Washington with her family and pets.

Thanks to Arbordale Publishing and Bookpleasures for furnishing this complimentary book in exchange for a review of the reader’s honest opinion.

This review will be posted on Bookpleasures and Amazon with links on Bookfun.org, Godinterest, Pinterest, LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Primate School

Primate SchoolTitle: Primate School
Author: Jennifer Keats Curtis
Publisher: Arbordale Publishing
ISBN: 978-1-62855-5646

“Nonhuman primates are not exactly like us, but they can think. They understand some language and can follow commands. Primates figure out how to solve problems. Some use tools,” Jennifer Keats Curtis writes in her children’s book, Primate School.

This thirty-two unnumbered page paperback with a thick folding jacket cover targets children ages four to eight years old who enjoy educational information about primates. With no scary scenes, it may be best read out loud by adults to beginner readers due to some complicated wording.

In this read about primates that mostly live at the zoo and are cared for by keepers that sometimes wear face masks, these fascinating animals are obviously intelligent. Learning there are more than five hundred species in the breed, they are warm-blooded, have hair and backbones, and produce milk for their young.

While wild primates learn from members of their group, the caged animals also learn from their keepers. Preserving them at the zoo, the caregivers feed them, encourage wild behaviors such as eating insects and leaves, play games, and make sure they stay healthy with medical check-ups. The primates are rewarded with treats when they perform correctly.

Showing photographs of the monkey, lemur, orangutan, chimpanzee, langur, tamarin, baboon, siamang, gorilla, and gibbon, many different species and their distinct characteristics and attributes are given.

The last four pages have more educational tools of learning activities for creative minds that involve a game deciphering which animals are primates, information on endangered species including coding, how to talk like a chimpanzee, and enrichment activities of several of the animals.

What makes this book fun is not only the different types of primates, but also the informational data at the back of the book for older readers regarding primates’ lives and activities. Any child will enjoy looking at the colorful pictures, although several of them show the animals inside a barred environment for human protection.

Award-winning author Curtis has written several children’s books devoted to nature and conservation. She and her family live in Maryland. Several zoos and organizations provided the photographs in exchange for using the book for fundraising purposes.

Thanks to Arbordale Publishing and Bookpleasures for furnishing this complimentary book in exchange for a review of the reader’s honest opinion.

This review will be posted on Bookpleasures and Amazon with links on Bookfun.org, Godinterest, Pinterest, LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Animal Mouths

Animal Mouths

Title: Animal Mouths
Author/Photographer: Mary Holland
Publisher: Arbordale Publishing
ISBN: 978-1-62855-5615

“Most humans eat plants and animals, which makes us omnivores. Like the opossum, we have many different kinds of teeth. How many kinds can you find when you open your mouth and look in the mirror?” Mary Holland asks in her children’s book, Animal Mouths.

Second in the Animal Anatomy and Adaptation series, this thirty-two unnumbered page paperback with a thick folding jacket cover targets children ages four to eight years old who enjoy educational information about nature. With no scary scenes except the concern some young ones may have regarding capturing and eating other animals and insects, only one picture shows an insect in a bird’s mouth. The book may be best read out loud by adults to beginner readers due to some complicated wording.

In this artistically photographed collection, what is inside the animals’ mouths is the focal point. Beginning with a moth, one learns as a caterpillar it has mouthparts but does not as an adult. Living for about a week, it does not eat so does not need to chew.

While turtles have no teeth but strong jaws, birds use their beaks to grab and devour their prey. Frogs have small teeth on their upper jaws while snakes have sharp teeth that regrow if they are broken. Butterflies have proboscises; robber flies have piercing-sucking mouthparts. Herbivore animals have flat teeth with incisors, and carnivores’ teeth include canines. Omnivores have many different combinations of teeth. By understanding the differences between the animals and the many kinds of teeth, one can readily identify them in nature.

The last four pages have more educational tools of learning activities for creative minds that involve other uses for mouths, a mammal teeth matching game, a bird beak puzzle of what they eat, and a glossary of teeth names.

What makes this book fun is not only the impressive photographs and explanation of teeth, but also the informational data at the end for older readers. Any child will enjoy viewing the animals and insects from their skull formations to the up-close pictures that show the differences between species.

Award-winning children’s book author, Holland is also a naturalist, nature photographer, and columnist living in Vermont with her dog. Having worked as a naturalist at New York’s Museum of the Hudson Highlands and the Massachusetts Audubon Society, she has written several children’s books.

Rating: 4.5 of 5

Thanks to Arbordale Publishing and Bookpleasures for furnishing this complimentary book in exchange for a review of the reader’s honest opinion.

This review will be posted on Bookpleasures and Amazon with links on Bookfun.org, Godinterest, Pinterest, LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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My Mom – Dog

Children Book : My Mom - DOGS (Animal Book) Animal Habitats (animals books for kids) (books about animals for children 1)Title: My Mom – Dog
Author: Dan Jackson
Publisher: Self-published
ASIN: BOOQKNVOQU

“The best way to enjoy your dog is to love it. Train it, exercise it. Take it with you wherever you go. Most of all, let it know who the boss is and that you love it. A dog will give you back all the love and loyalty that you give it,” Dan Jackson writes about these canines in his e-book, My Mom – Dog.

Part of the Animals Books series, this twenty-seven page e-book targets children ages four to twelve years old who enjoy learning about animals, especially dogs. Due to its complicated wording, the book would best be read out loud to beginner readers. With no scary scenes, it would make a quiet time story or to use in a science class.

Large colorful photographs of these lovable creatures grace almost every page with one or two sentences underneath in an easy-to-read black font. With many scenes including dogs and cats, they are interesting to look at and view by any age group. Although the book series is about mothers, there is a minor reference to them in this one.

With dogs usually being domesticated animals, here are some interesting but well-known tidbits mentioned in this educational read:

  • There are wild and domestic dogs.
  • There are about four hundred million dogs in the world.
  • Many dogs are bred to be service animals.
  • The most popular breed is the Labrador, which comes in several colors.
  • Dogs have poor eyesight but a good sense of smell and hearing.
  • A year in human life is about seven years in a dog’s life.
  • Puppies can barely see when they are born.
  • A puppy has twenty-eight teeth, but an adult dog has forty-two of them.
  • If a dog is eating, sleeping, or self-grooming, let it be.
  • Long-haired canines need to be bathed regularly.
  • If a dog swims in the sea, he will not smell good.
  • These animals are known as man’s best friends.

If a child needs a quick source of information about this peculiar animal for a report, this e-book has many facts listed. Although not a story book or simple picture book, it is a collection of descriptions of dogs and how they live.

Thanks to the author for furnishing this complimentary e-book in exchange for a review based on the reader’s honest opinion.

This review will be posted on Amazon with links on Bookfun.org, Godinterest, Pinterest, and LinkedIn.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors on this review.

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My Mom – Cat

Children Book : My Mom - CATS (Animal Book) Animal Habitats (animals books for kids) (books about animals for children 4)Title: My Mom – Cat
Author: Dan Jackson
Publisher: Self-published
ASIN: BOOQK4OKFO

“Cats will knead their paws to show they are happy; they will purr too. If a cat is pleased to see someone, it will pull its tail up vertically; however, if a cat is wagging its tail, unlike a dog, it means that it is angry!” Dan Jackson writes about these creatures in his e-book, My Mom – Cat.

Part of the Animals Books series, this twenty-nine page e-book targets children ages four to twelve years old who enjoy learning about animals, especially cats. Due to its complicated wording, the book would best be read out loud to beginner readers. With no scary scenes, it would make a quiet time story or to use in a science class.

Large colorful photographs of these lovable creatures grace almost every page with one or three sentences underneath in an easy-to-read black font. The scenes are interesting to look at and view by any age group. Although the series is about mothers, there is no reference to them in this one.

With the cats being such domesticated animals, here are some interesting tidbits mentioned in this educational read:

  • There are wild or feral cats and domestic cats.
  • There are about five hundred million cats in the world.
  • Like dogs, cats have the same life spans of one human year equals seven years to them.
  • Since cats are nocturnal, they need lots of protein to be able to see in the dark.
  • Cats sleep an average of fourteen hours a day.
  • Males are called toms; females are mollies or queens, and babies are kittens.
  • Kittens are born blind.
  • Cats have five toes on their front paws and only four on their back paws.
  • These animals have thirty teeth, sixteen on top and fourteen on bottom.
  • A female cat can have up to eighteen kittens in a year.
  • They can run up to thirty miles per hour.

If a child needs a quick source of information about this peculiar animal for a report, this e-book has many facts listed. Although not a story book or simple picture book, it is a collection of descriptions of cats and how they live.

Thanks to the author for furnishing this complimentary e-book in exchange for a review based on the reader’s honest opinion.

This review will be posted on Amazon with links on Bookfun.org, Godinterest, Pinterest, and LinkedIn.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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My Mom – Lion

Children Book : My Mom - LION (Animal Book) Animal Habitats (animals books for kids) (books about animals for children 5)Title: My Mom: Lion
Author: Dan Jackson
Publisher: Self-published
ASIN: BOOQKNVM3K

“All female lions know one another. When they meet, they do a lion greeting ceremony of rubbing and low purring to make sure they are friends,” Dan Jackson writes about these creatures in his e-book, My Mom – Lion.

Part of the Animals Books series, this thirty page e-book targets children ages four to twelve years old who enjoy learning about animals, especially lions. Due to its complicated wording, the book would best be read out loud to beginner readers. With no scary scenes or violence but mentioning they eat meat including zebras and wildebeests, it would make a nice quiet time story or to use in a science class.

Large colorful photographs of these grand creatures grace almost every page with one or two sentences underneath in an easy-to-read black font. With no pictures of hunting or eating other animals, scenes are interesting to look at and view by any age group. Whether the animal is in its pride, resting in the grass, or protecting others, they are displayed as babies and adults.

With the lions being known as the “kings of the jungle,” here are some interesting tidbits mentioned in this educational read:

  • Lions live in open plains and woodlands, mainly in Africa and India.
  • A male is called a tom; a female is called a lioness, and babies are called cubs.
  • A litter usually consists of two to three cubs.
  • Males grow up to four feet tall and weigh up to 530 pounds.
  • Most lions live to age fifteen in the wild.
  • Lions can run up to eighty kilometers per hour.
  • Females do most of the hunting.
  • They live in a pride of twelve to fifteen lions, with only one adult male in the group.
  • A lion’s roar can be heard eighty kilometers away.
  • Young lions sleep up to twenty hours a day.

If a child needs a quick source of information about this peculiar mammal for a report, this book has many facts listed. Although not a story book or simple picture book, it is a collection of descriptions about lions and how they live.

Thanks to the author for furnishing this complimentary e-book in exchange for a review based on the reader’s honest opinion.

This review will be posted on Amazon with links on Bookfun.org, Godinterest, Pinterest, and LinkedIn.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors.

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My Mom – Alligator

Children Book : My Mom - ALLIGATOR  (Animal Book) Animal Habitats (animals books for kids) (books about animals for children 3)Title: My Mom – Alligator
Author: Dan Jackson
Publisher: Self-published
ASIN: BOOQK4OEHY

“Alligator moms lay eggs; the eggs have hard shells. They can lay a lot of eggs, usually between ten and fifty at a time. That’s a lot of babies!” Dan Jackson writes about these creatures in his e-book, My Mom – Alligator.

Part of the Animals Books series, this twenty-eight page e-book targets children ages four to twelve years old who enjoy learning about animals, especially alligators. Due to its complicated wording, the book would best be read out loud to beginner readers. With no scary scenes or violence, it would make a nice bedtime or quiet time story or to use in a science class.

Large colorful photographs of these exotic creatures grace almost every page with one or two sentences underneath in an easy-to-read black font. With some pictures of crocodiles included, they are interesting to look at and view by any age group. Whether the animal is slithering in or out of water or showing off their teeth, they are displayed as babies and adults.

With the alligators being such unique mammals, here are some interesting tidbits mentioned in this educational read:

  • They are two types of alligators, with the Chinese types being endangered.
  • Alligators are cold-blooded.
  • They usually live in the South in America.
  • They weigh up to one thousand pounds and can be eleven feet long.
  • Mother alligators lay between ten and fifty eggs at a time.
  • These creatures have special eyes so they can see underwater.
  • There are seventy-four to eighty teeth in an alligator’s mouth.
  • Their strong paws and tails help them swim very fast.
  • The thick skin plates on alligators protect them from snake bites.

If a child needs a quick source of information about this peculiar mammal for a report, this book has many facts listed. Although not a story book or simple picture book, it is a collection of descriptions about alligators and how they live.

Thanks to the author for furnishing this complimentary e-book in exchange for a review based on the reader’s honest opinion.

This review will be posted on Amazon with links on Bookfun.org, Godinterest, Pinterest, and LinkedIn.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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My Mom – Dolphin

Children Book : My Mom - DOLPHINS (Animal Book) Animal Habitats (animals books for kids) (books about animals for children 2)Title: My Mom – Dolphin
Author: Dan Jackson
Publisher: Self-published
ASIN: BOOQK3JMSC

“The Bottlenose dolphin is the most common type, but there are lots of other varieties. Of the forty-one types, most live in the sea, but five varieties live in rivers where the water is not salty,” Dan Jackson writes about these creatures in his e-book, My Mom – Dolphin.

Part of the Animals Books series, this twenty-eight page e-book targets children ages four to twelve years old who enjoy learning about animals, especially the interesting dolphin. Due to its complicated wording, the book would best be read out loud to beginner readers. With no scary scenes or violence, it would make a nice bedtime or quiet time story or to use in a science class.

Large colorful photographs of beautiful dolphins grace almost every page with one or two sentences underneath in an easy-to-read black font. With some pictures of killer whales included, they are interesting to look at and view by any age group. Whether the animal is communicating, jumping out of the water, or guiding its offspring, they are shown both up close and swimming in pods.

With the dolphin being such a unique mammal, here are some interesting tidbits mentioned in this educational read:

  • They are cousins to whales, but smaller in size.
  • Usually they are born around three feet long but grow to over eight feet, weighing around four hundred pounds at maturity.
  • Dolphins can hold their breath underwater for fifteen minutes.
  • They communicate with clicks and whistles.
  • A baby is called a calf; its mother is a cow, and its father is a bull.
  • Dolphins never sleep; one half of their brain stays awake to be on alert.
  • Those in captivity live twice as long as those in the wild who reach about twelve years of age.
  • Although they have eighty to one hundred teeth, they do not chew their food but swallow it.
  • They live in both the sea and rivers.
  • Dolphins can swim up to twenty-five feet per second.

If a child needs a quick source of information about this peculiar mammal for a report, this book has many facts listed. Although not a story book or simple picture book, it is a collection of descriptions about dolphins and how they live.

Thanks to the author for furnishing this complimentary e-book in exchange for a review based on the reader’s honest opinion.

This review will be posted on Amazon with links on Bookfun.org, Godinterest, Pinterest, and LinkedIn.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Furry Logic

Title: Furry Logic, 10th Anniversary Edition: A Guide to Life’s Little Challenges
Author & Illustrator: Jane Seabrook
Publisher: Ten Speed Press
ISBN: 978-1-60774-716-1

“The anniversary book is the ninth in the series and a chance for me to reflect on how it began – with some of the first paintings that appear in this book – and grew to a collection that is now several hundred in number and that has found homes all around the world!” Seabrook pens at the conclusion of her book, Furry Logic, 10th Anniversary Edition: A Guide to Life’s Little Challenges.

At ninety-six pages, this six-by-six inch small hardbound targets those who enjoy whimsical animal drawings with silly sayings that often have an undercurrent of truth and meaning. With no scary or violent scenes, children to adults can enjoy the fanciful artwork and quotes.

As per the Artist’s Notes, the ten-year assortment of fun and odd animals are done in watercolor, mostly with fine details of feathers, fur, and emotional expressions. With designs usually on the left side of the page, there is simple, easy-to-read black or white wording against colored backgrounds on the right side of the page.

Not only are the illustrations interesting and captivating with bulging, expressive eyes that mock, stare, or twinkle with glee, the sayings add depth to the creations. Whether making fun of oneself, reminding to be on good behavior, or emitting sheer joy and happiness, the drawn animals speak for themselves without the quotes.

Take the wise owl peeking out of a tree hole with that lazy, “leave me alone” look who reminds us to “Smile first thing in the morning” with the words “Get it over with” added later. Or the single penguin wishing to “Always remember you are unique,” but when the page is turned and there is a small army of penguins walking in the snow, the words “just like everyone else” are written along the bottom.

Here are some other quick notes to ponder, sometimes gleaned from other sources acknowledged at the end of the book:
Be yourself. Nobody is better qualified.
No one is listening until you make a mistake.
You don’t have to agree with me, but it’s quicker.
I don’t repeat gossip. So listen carefully.
The quickest way for a parent to get a child’s attention is to sit down and look comfortable.

Although simplistic in format, this book would make a nice gift to cheer someone up or be on a guestroom table, especially those that enjoy quirky animals or charming sayings.

Thanks to Blogging for Books for furnishing this complimentary book in exchange for a review based on the reader’s honest opinion.

This review will be posted on Blogging for Books and Amazon with links on Bookfun.org, Godinterest, Pinterest, and LinkedIn.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Weird & Wonderful Creations

Title: Weird & Wonderful Creations
Publisher: Zonderkidz
ISBN: 978-0-310-73124-5

“God made everything. It is all good. He made the big, strong eagle and the squeaky, scary-looking bat!” announces Zonderkidz’s children’s book, Weird & Wonderful Creations.

Part of the Made by God series, this numbered one hundred and twenty-eight page over-sized square hardbound targets children four to eight years old interested in knowing about God’s creations. Containing no scary scenes except for those of spiders or snakes that may bother some children, its reading level is for developing readers. Due to complicated wording, it may be best read out loud to young children.

Combining four books into one, each flows into the next, ending with a list of other books in the series as well as those in a nature series. With small to large colored photographs by Shutterstock, bright sidebars of interesting tidbits overlap orange panels on the outer section of each page.

Covering four to five specimens over thirty pages each, the first section is on spiders, snakes, bees, and bats while the second division has big and little bugs. The third involves sea creatures while the last part is about poisonous, smelly, and amazing plants. A two-page index completes the book.

Giving God the glory for making all creatures, one can learn about spiders, which are not insects but animals called arachnids. With over three hundred thousand kinds, none can be found in Antarctica and they do not have antennae.

Check out the butterflies that fly up to two thousand miles to find a warm environmnet, often hanging upside down at night. With over eighteen thousand types, they live six to eight months in groups called flutters.

Do not forget to read about the sea turtles as there are seven kinds, living to eighty years or more. The male stays in water his entire life while a female lays fifty to one hundred eggs in the sand.

A unique plant is the poisonous fly agaric which is one of fourteen thousand species of mushrooms. Being red with white polka dots, it grows mainly in the northern half of the earth.

Learning about these animals, insects, and plants will perk interest in young ones that God has a creative sense of humor as He has made so many different things to observe. Touting over two hundred facts, this is a good source for a book report or an educational tool to understand God’s special creations.

Thanks to Book Look Bloggers for furnishing this complimentary book in exchange for a review based on the reader’s honest opinions.

 

This review will be posted on Book Look Bloggers, DeeperShopping, and Amazon with links on Bookfun.org, Godinterest, Pinterest, and LinkedIn.
GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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