Category Archives: Childrens

The Lake and the Secret Sweetheart

Title: The Lake and the Secret Sweetheart
Author: Judith Grimme
Publisher: Encourage Publishing
ISBN: 978-0-9985592-8-5

“Who do you think that card came from? It’s so mysterious, don’t you think?” Simone asks Lucy in Judith Grimme’s children’s book, The Lake and the Secret Sweetheart.

~ What ~
This one-hundred-and-fifty-six-page paperback targets nine- to twelve-year-old children who like stories about family relationships and friendships during the 1960s in the Midwest. With no profanity or adult situations, it would best be read out loud to some readers due to occasionally complicated wording. The ending includes extras and activities, the author’s biography, information about other books in the series, and content ratings.

The final of a four in The Front Porch Diaries, this series chapter book set in Indiana continues with third-grader Lucy and her family going to a cottage by the lake and having her best friend, Simone, and her grandparents visit too. Not only does Lucy have to overcome her past fears, but she wants to know who sent her a special valentine’s card. With her friend soon returning to France, the two cherish their last few weeks together.

~ Why ~
This is a nice read about the past when kids spent ample time outside, enjoying the dog days of summer swimming and fishing with family. I appreciate the references to games like Monopoly and Little League baseball along with G.I. Joe dolls, Cracker Jacks, McDonald’s, and various consumer items. Having read the 2 other books in the series to our six-year-old granddaughter via Facetime, she is anticipating hearing this one next.

~ Why Not ~
Children who do not like chapter books or series that are written about how it was over fifty years ago may not appreciate this read. Others may not be ready to learn about boy/girl relationships. Some younger readers may be concerned about the fear of swimming or do not like the mention of God and the Bible. It is helpful if you read the books in order to understand the background (we did not read the second book but wish we had since this one relates to its story).

~ Wish ~
I found the book may be too advanced for a first grader due to the protagonist’s fears and love interest. There were far fewer French words in this one compared to the first book. The series should be professionally edited.

~ Want ~
If your elementary-school-age child likes chapter books that are in a series, this would be a fun read if he or she wants to know about someone having a crush on them, overcoming a past fear, and praying about being afraid.

Thanks to BookCrash and the author for this complimentary book that I am under no obligation to review.

#TheLakeandtheSecretSweetheart #JudithGrimme #TheFrontPorchDiaries #EncouragePublishing #Bookcrash

This book can be found at https://amzn.to/2Nt6pTG

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Mr. Inker Finds a Home

Title: Mr. Inker Finds a Home
Author: Christina Francine
Illustrator: Ksennia Kudriavtseva
Publisher: Waldorf Publishing
ISBN: 978-1-64764-880-0

“Your friend will have something solid from you to hold, and maybe he will write a letter back to you,” Mr. Inker tells Rafiq in Christina Francine’s children’s book, Mr. Inker Finds a Home.

~ What ~
Part of the Waldorf Readers series, this forty-four-unnumbered-page paperback targets children ages six to twelve years old who enjoy stories about a talking pen. With no scary scenes, it may be best read out loud to beginner readers due to some complicated wording. Simplistic illustrations grace half the pages.

In this short story, a writing pen named Mr. Inker is given as a birthday gift to a boy named Rajiq. When the pen begins to talk, the child is excited but leary as he is new to the country and misses his friends from Pakistan. As the writing tool coaxes the kid to write a couple of jokes, he also suggests writing to his old friends, hoping he will get a response.

~ Why ~
Since we have a six-year-old granddaughter who is learning to read, this is an apropos story that stresses how writing is not only fun, but important in keeping in touch with others. I like that it focuses on writing instead of typing letters on a computer. With a drawing on one side of the open pages, the opposite sides have bold font wording against white backgrounds, making them easy to read.

~ Why Not
Those who do not like reading may not like this book. Others may struggle with the three-and four-syllable words, and some may not understand the corny jokes. Those who prefer picture books may not like the rudimentary drawings.

~ Wish ~
Although the illustrations are understandable, it would be nice if there were more detail to each of them. There are a few punctuation errors that could be corrected.

~ Want ~
If you are looking for a book about a talking pen that finds its home with a young boy who is new to America and misses his friends, this may be a good way for a young reader to adjust to a new life while keeping in touch with the past.

Thanks to Waldorf Publishing, Bookpleasures, and the author for this complimentary book that I am under no obligation to review.

#WaldorfPublishing #ChristinaFrancine #WaldolfReaders #Bookpleasures #MrInklerFindsaHome

This book can be purchased at https://amzn.to/37ihUq3

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The Farm and the Risky Ride

Title: The Farm and the Risky Ride
Author: Judith Grimme
Publisher: Encourage Publishing
ISBN: 978-0-9985592-7-8

“I cannot wait, either! That will be such a fun holiday! But I’m still a little nervous about riding horses,” Simone confides to Lucy in Judith Grimme’s children’s book, The Farm and the Risky Ride.

~ What ~
This one-hundred-and-forty-four-page paperback targets nine- to twelve-year-old children who like stories about family relationships and friendships during the 1960s in the Midwest. With no profanity or adult situations, it would best be read out loud to some readers due to occasionally complicated wording. The ending includes extras and activities, the author’s biography, information about other books in the series, and content ratings.

The third of four series chapter book set in Indiana continues with third-grader Lucy and her new friend, Simone, going to Lucy’s grandparents’ farm for two weeks in the summer while her brother and Simone’s sibling stay home and build a treehouse. Lucy and Simone not only get to collect chicken eggs, milk cows, pick berries, and make camp pies, but they also go horseback riding and witness the birth of a foal.

~ Why ~
This is a lovely read about the past when kids spent ample time outside, enjoying nature and animals. I appreciate the references to kite flying, Instamatic cameras, Barbie and Midge dolls, Bible stories, drive-in movies, the Amish, and various outdoor games. Having read the first book to our six-year-old granddaughter via Facetime, she was excited to start having me read her this one.

~ Why Not ~
Children who do not like chapter books or series that are written about how it was over fifty years ago may not appreciate this read. Others may not relate to the characters, especially if they have no siblings or do not live in a small-town environment. Some younger readers may be concerned about getting injured riding horses or do not like the mention of God and the Bible. It is helpful if you read the books in order to understand the background (we did not read the second book but wish we had).

~ Wish ~
I found the book a bit anti-climatic, so the series may not be for older readers. There were far fewer French words in this one compared to the first book.

~ Want ~
If your elementary-school-age child likes chapter books that are in a series, this would be a fun read if he or she wants to know about life on a farm before electronics consumed our lives.

Thanks to BookCrash and the author for this complimentary book that I am under no obligation to review.

#TheFarmandtheRiskyRide #JudithGrimme #TheFrontPorchDiaries #EncouragePublishing #Bookcrash

This book can be found at https://amzn.to/2Tsp7y7

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Jairus’s Girl

Title: Jairus’s Girl
Author: L.R. Hay
Publisher: Salted Lightly
ISBN: 978-1-916077003

“Well I’m not dead now, and I’m hungry. It’s essential I get some food: this Jesus person said so,” Tammie demands after she is healed in L.R. Hay’s children’s book, Jairus’s Girl.

~ What ~
The second in the Young Testament series, this one-hundred-and-eighty-page paperback targets nine- to twelve-year-old children who like enhanced Biblical stories. With no profanity or adult situations, it is a young girl’s version of the life of Christ as an adult.

Set in Capernaum two-thousand years ago, eleven-year-old Tammie is an only child who loves to help others with her tender heart as she happily keeps tabs of everyone and everything in her village. When she becomes deathly ill, she is awoken by a wonderful man named Jesus, who does miracles near and abroad. As she hears about Him and meets His friends such as Matthew, Simon Peter, Andrew, and Lucius, she learns and witnesses the many stories from the Gospels from Christ’s miracles and healings to His death and resurrection.

~ Why ~
This is a charming, quirky read from a young one’s standpoint living when Jesus comes to Earth. I enjoyed the blend of many Biblical characters such as the healing of the centurion’s slave, the woman with the issue of blood, the paralyzed man, and others. The added humorous comments and conversations between Tammie and her friends, Daniel and Dibs, will delight some readers.

~ Why Not ~
Those who do not have a personal relationship with Jesus Christ may not approve of this book. Children who do not like chapter books written about the Bible may not appreciate it. Others may not agree with the made-up scenarios that have a young protagonist hearing, seeing, or talking about the multiple miracles of the Son of God. The eternal plan of salvation contains no obvious confession of one’s sin.

~ Wish ~
Due to the British punctuation, spelling, and grammar differences in the book, I wish an American version were offered to make it easier for young readers here in the United States to comprehend. I found the main character to be too perfect and idealistic. I prefer all pronouns of God capitalized for reverence.

~ Want ~
If your preteen likes historical fiction of Jesus in the New Testament, this would make a nice gift, albeit ample liberties have been taken that are not completely accurate to the Word of God.

Thanks to BookCrash and the author for this complimentary book that I am under no obligation to review.

#Bookcrash #SaltedLightly #LRHay #JairussGirl #TheYoungTestament
This book can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2Zf6zoE

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Filed under *** OK - Don't Love It, Don't Hate It, Book Review, Childrens, Fiction

How to Be a Big Brother

Title: How to Be a Big Brother
Author: Ashley Moulton
Illustrator: Kavel Rafferty
Publisher: Rockridge Press
ISBN: 978-1-64739-140-9

“By the time you’re finished reading this book, you’ll be ready to be the best brother ever!” Ashley Moulton writes in the welcome page of her book, How to Be a Big Brother: A Guide to Being the Best Older Sibling Ever.

~ What ~
This fifty-two-page paperback targets five- to seven-year-old males who are going to become older siblings for the first time. With no profanity or scenes, there are four chapters, ending with a congratulations page, acknowledgments, and author’s biography.

After ownership and welcome pages, the four sections cover before the baby arrives, becoming a big brother, being a big brother, and growing up together. Including personal stories of other big brothers, there are also topics about nap time, feedings, diaper changing, bath time, playtime, rolls, and family time. Each chapter concludes with suggestions of what to do together and questions about what the soon-to-be older brother thinks or feels. Several super safe brother tips are added.

~ Why ~
Our three-year-old grandson has recently become a big brother to a little sister, so this book may be helpful as he grows up and accepts the fact he is no longer an only child. I appreciate the personal stories of seeing the sibling’s ultrasound, meeting the baby for the first time, and playing with toys.

Some highlighted questions to discuss include:
What makes me the most nervous about becoming a big brother?
Who will be taking care of me while I’m waiting?
When will things go back to normal?
How do I feel about being a big brother?

~ Why Not ~
Those who are not becoming an older sibling or brother will not need this book. It is best for a parent to read this out loud to beginner readers as they may have trouble with the two- and three-syllable words. The illustrations are rudimentary and simplistic.

~ Wish ~
I found the book should only be read out loud to the targeted age group as it may be too hard for a first or second grader to comprehend reading alone.

~ Want ~
If your young son is going to be a big brother soon, this may be a helpful guide book for a parent to read to him as he transitions to not being the only child in the family.

Thanks to Callisto Publisher’s Club and the author for this complimentary book that I am under no obligation to review.

#RockridgePress #CallistoPublishersClub #AshleyMoulton #KavelRafferty #HowtoBeaBigBrother

This book can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2zNjkwc

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The Print Penmanship Workbook for Kids

Title: The Print Penmanship Workbook for Kids
Author Crystal Radke
Publisher: Rockridge Press
ISBN: 978-1-64611-921-9

“As children read the animal facts in the book and then write them, their brains make connections to their learning,” Crystal Radke writes in the notes to parents in her book, The Print Penmanship Workbook for Kids: Improve Your Handwriting with Fun Animal Facts.

~ What ~
This ninety-page paperback targets children ages six to nine years old who need help learning to write and enjoy learning about animals. With no scary scenes, it begins with a note to parents and before and after writing comparisons, contains three sections promoting proper writing, and ends with a certificate and the author’s biography.

The first section has tracing and writing letters of the alphabet in order, using both upper and lower case letters. The second part has words to trace and write, while the final section involves tracing and writing sentences. All sections include facts of animals along with coloring breaks to color.

~ Why ~
Our six-year-old granddaughter is learning to write and read so this is a timely book for a first grader to practice her skills. Since the book has fun facts about animals, she can learn something while tracing the letters and words. I like how the book progresses from letter writing to word and sentence writing.

Some animal facts:
Jellyfish do not have brains, hearts, bones, or eyes.
Porcupines are very good climbers.
Stick insets are the longest bugs in the world.
A moose’s antlers can reach almost six feet across.
Female bald eagles are bigger than male bald eagles.
A group of rhinoceroses is called a crash.

~ Why Not ~
Young children or those with hand/eye coordination issues may not like this book, but it would help those who have trouble writing. Some kids may not be interested in the animal facts. Beginner readers may be frustrated reading the two- and three-syllable words.

~ Wish ~
Including an index with each animal may be helpful but not necessary.

~ Want ~
If your child needs to work on refining their print penmanship, this would make an excellent workbook, especially if they like learning about animals at the same time.

Thanks to Callisto Publisher’s Club and the author for this complimentary book that I am under no obligation to review.

#RockridgePress #CallistoPublishersClub #CrystalRadke #ThePrintPenmanshipWorkbookforKids

This book can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2WYAxdX

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Filed under ***** Great - A Keeper, If You Borrow It, Give It Back!, Book Review, Business / Money / Education, Childrens

3 Otters Princess Dress Up Set

6 PIECE KID’S COSPLAY ACCESSORIES

~ What ~
Made of ABS plastic and soft fabric, this 6-piece girl’s princess dress up set has a tiara, wand, pair of gloves, necklace, earrings, and a ring. Available in gold with red, purple, or sea blue, the items are recommended for ages three to twelve years old. All items arrive in cellophane bags in a resealable bag, ready for giving.

~ Why ~
Our 3-year-old granddaughter loves to play dress-up, especially as a princess, so this is an ideal set that will delight her. I like that it includes the wand and gloves as they are not usually found in most sets. The red plastic stones are bright and noticeable. The earrings are clip-on.

~ Why Not ~
Some girls may not care for a glam princess theme. Others may find their plastic quality comparable to similar sets found at dollar stores. I found that if you fasten the crown to the headband, the two end tabs could easily break off if removing it.

~ Wish ~
It would be nice if a sash/banner came with the set.

~ Want ~
If you are looking for a set of dress-up accessories for your little princess, this will be a good choice since it includes many more items than most sets.

Thanks for 3 Otters for this discounted product that I am under no obligation to evaluate.

#RankBoosterReview #Sponsoredbysally #3Otters #PrincessDressUpSet

This product can be purchased at https://amzn.to/3dupJLf

 

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Dinosaurs!

Title: Dinosaurs!
Author: “Dinosaur George” Blasing
Illustrators: Annalisa & Marina Durante
Publisher: Rockridge Press
ISBN: 978-1-64611-429-0

“Dinosaurs are some of the most amazing animals that ever lived,” the beginning states in “Dinosaur George” Blasing’s book, Dinosaurs! My First Book about Carnivores.

~ What ~
This sixty-eight-page paperback targets children ages four to eight years old who enjoy educational books, especially if they involve dinosaurs. With no profanity or too scary scenes, over thirty carnivores are explained with well-drawn, expressive illustrations. The ending has a glossary, index, and biographies on the author and illustrators.

After an introduction page about what carnivores are and the period they lived, colorful artwork is on the left side of the page with the name and pronunciation of the dinosaur on the right side, followed by a descriptive paragraph, highlighted facts, and information on its length, height, weight, when, where, eating habits, and animal comparison.

~ Why ~
Our three-year-old grandson has a thing about dinosaurs, able to tell you what kind they are, so this is a timely book for him. I like the information on the creatures and their uniqueness. Adding the color-coded Triassic, Jurassic, and Cretaceous periods are helpful for older children.

Some interesting facts about carnivores are:
The Coelophysis was the fastest animal.
TheCryolophosuarus was one of the largest.
The Megalosaurus has a strong neck.
The Gallimimus swallowed small stones for digestion.
The Deinocheirus had small but thick claws for digging.

~ Why Not ~
Young children may be frightened by some of the depictions, especially those involving sharp teeth. Some may find there is limited information, but it may be acceptable for the age group. Beginner readers may be frustrated with the two- and three-syllable words.

~ Wish ~
Being a Christian, I wish the book did not promote the earth being hundreds of millions years old.

~ Want ~
If your child is fascinated by cool-looking creatures such as dinosaurs and wants to learn a thing or two, this would be an interesting and educational read.

Thanks to Callisto Publisher’s Club and the authors for this complimentary that I am under no obligation to review.

#RockridgePress #CallistoPublishersClub #DinosaurGeorgeBlasing #AnnalisaMarinaDurante #DinosuarsMyFirstBookaboutCarnivores

This book can be purchased at https://amzn.to/2z0qk8L

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Sign Language for Kids Activity Book

Title: Sign Language for Kids Activity Book
Author: Tara Adams
Illustrator: Natalia Sanabria
Publisher: Rockridge Press
ISBN: 978-1-64611-406-1

“This book will help you start learning how to communicate in a whole new way using your hands,” Tara Adams writes in the introduction to her book, Sign Language for Kids Activity Book: 50 Fun Games and Activities to Start Signing.

~ What ~
This one-hundred-and-twenty-six-page paperback is targeted for children ages eight to twelve years old who want to learn American Sign Language. With no profanity or too scary scenes, it is divided into two sections with explanations, colorful illustrations, and activities, ending with an answer key, resources, acknowledgments, and the author’s and illustrator’s biographies.

After an introduction, the first half has essential signs with drawings of the alphabet, numbers, conversations, home, family, pets, actions, thoughts, feelings, activities, food and drink, outdoors, school, education, and descriptive words. The second part has fifty exercises, games, puzzles, and activities to do.

~ Why ~
Having taken ASL in college, I am excited to show our six-year-old granddaughter this educational book. I like that the pictures are easy to understand on how to hold the hand and fingers. The activities promote how to sign.

Some of the fun activities are:
Matching
Guess the Food
Secret Message
Grammar Practice
Signing Sleuth!
What Did I Say?
Word Search

~ Why Not ~
Those who do not need or want to learn sign language may have no need for this read. Younger children may find some of the activities too complicated to understand or comprehend.

~ Wish ~
I wish some of the exercises were a little simpler for beginner signers.

~ Want ~
If your child is interested in learning a new language using hands, this is a perfect beginner’s book to engage and instruct them.

Thanks to Callisto Publisher’s Club and the author for this complimentary book that I am under no obligation to review.

#RockridgePress #CallistoPublishersClub #TaraAdams #NataliaSanabria #SignLanguageforKids

This book can be purchased at https://amzn.to/3dSJiNxbook

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Filed under ***** Great - A Keeper, If You Borrow It, Give It Back!, Book Review, Business / Money / Education, Childrens

JOJO Siwa Unicorn Hair Bows

 

6 SIWA HAIR BOW BARRETTES

~ What ~
Made of colorful fabric ribbons, this pack includes 6 clip-on hair bows with a unicorn and mermaid theme. Measuring 5 inches wide and 2 inches tall, the tied-bows come in fashionable colors that include unicorns, mermaids, octopuses, scales, balloons, rainbows, and solid sky blue. Each has a small round Jojo Siwa disc and long lobster clip backing. Instructions are not added, and they arrived on a header card in a cellophane bag.

~ Why ~
Since our 3 and 6-year-old granddaughters love dressing up with fancy bows, especially if they relate to unicorns and mermaids, this is a lovely set that they will enjoy. I appreciate their long back clips are made of sturdy metal and not cheap plastic. Adding the metal heart disc is thoughtful.

~ Why Not ~
Those who have short hair may not be able to use clips like this. Some may not like the sharply pointed clip part.

~ Wish ~
Since this set is mainly in light blue and pink, I wish these were available in other themes such as flowers, princesses, and other animals.

~ Want ~
If you are looking for an inexpensive collection of 6 different glam hair barrettes that are large and colorful, this set is a perfect choice for those who pink and blue accessories.

Thanks to Bocianelli for this discounted product that I am under no obligation to review.

#RankBoosterReview #SponsoredbySunnyPro #Onlyesh #UnicornHairClips #MermaidHairclips

This product can be purchased at https://amzn.to/3bpmMu3

 

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