Category Archives: Childrens

All Fish Faces

ALL FISH FACES: Photos and Fun Facts about Tropical Reef Fish (Ocean Friends)Title: All Fish Faces
Author/Photographer: Tam Warner Minton
Publisher: Independently Published
ISBN: 978-1-521807781

“Tropical fish all over the world have faces that are alike in their characteristics, yet are still unique,” Tam Warner Minton writes in the introduction of her children’s book, All Fish Faces: Photos & Fun Facts About Tropical Reef Fish.

~ What ~
The first book in the Ocean Friends series, this numbered seventy-page paperback targets children ages four to twelve years old who enjoy educational information and photographs about tropical fish. With no scary scenes but containing the possibility of being poisoned, it may be best read out loud by adults to beginner readers due to some complicated wording.

In this informative book, the author explains the different types, features, and characteristics of tropical fish that include puffer, angel, butterfly, parrot, trigger, file, frog, toad, scorpion, lion, and box fish as well as groupers, clownfish, anemonefish, and others. Also mentioned are ways to protect and preserve our oceans and coral reefs. All pictures include the name of the fish and location where found.

~ Why ~
Although I am not one who has tropical fish, I appreciate the dedication and enthusiasm the author/photographer has for these creatures. The photographs in full color are stunning and beautiful, showing details of underwater life. I enjoyed learning about “cleaner fish,” those that sleep with a transparent covering, how some can change their sex, and those that are venomous.

~ Why Not ~
Those who do not like fish may steer away from this educational book, but they may learn a thing or two of interest. Others may want formatted descriptions listed such as average length, weight, eating habits, lifespan, et cetera.

~ Wish ~
I wish more books were written that provided knowledge and information that a young child could learn in a fun, engaging way. It would be helpful if there were an index or glossary at the end of the book. With many grammatical and punctuation errors, it has been marked down a full point and would be changed if the writing were corrected.

~ Want ~
If you are looking for a book about fish for preschool to elementary aged children, this will delight young readers, but you should be aware the copy reviewed had writing errors in it.

Thanks to Bookpleasures and the author for this complimentary book that I am freely evaluating.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Filed under **** Good - Will Be Glad to Pass On to Others, Animals / Pets, Book Review, Childrens

God Gave Us Family

Title: God Gave Us Family
Author: Lisa Tawn Bergren
Illustrator: David Hohn
Publisher: Waterbrook
ISBN: 978-1-60142-876-9

“Whenever somebody is loving and caring for another, that’s a family,” Little Pup is told in Lisa Tawn Bergren’s children’s book, God Gave Us Family.

 ~ What ~
This forty-page hardbound targets children ages three to eight years old who like to read stories about how God gives us each a special family. With no scary scenes, the book may be best read out loud to beginner readers based on the complicated two- and three-syllable words.

In this short tale, an inquisitive wolf named Little Pup wishes he had a sibling, comparing himself to other families that have several. His parents explain that there are different types of families and God makes us part of His family too. Adoption, single parenting, grandparents, and extended families are mentioned as the wolf and his parents travel to a family reunion. There, Little Pup plays with his cousin and realizes that although families are different, he loves the one God gave him.

~Why ~
I like how many different types of families are discussed and how God gives us the one we are in for a reason. The illustrations of the pack of wolves traveling to the reunion are full color, expressive, and detailed, keeping young ones engaged and entertained.

~ Why Not ~
Those who do not believe in God may avoid this book. With many types of family units described, the story does not include those who have no children and those with blended families.

~ Wish ~
I prefer all pronouns of God capitalized for reverence.

~ Want ~
If you are looking for a children’s book that focuses on family and God wanting us to love and enjoy the one we are given, this is a thoughtful choice.

Thanks to Blogging for Books for this complimentary book that I am freely reviewing.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Filed under **** Good - Will Be Glad to Pass On to Others, Childrens, Christian

Lizzy the Lioness

Lizzy the LionessTitle: Lizzy the Lioness
Author: Lisa Bevere
Illustrator:  Kirsteen Harris-Jones
Publisher: Tommy Nelson
ISBN: 978-0-7180-9658-8

“Sometimes the bravest thing you can do is to ask for help,” Lizzy is reminded in Lisa Bevere’s children’s book Lizzy the Lioness.

~ What ~
This thirty-two-page oversized hardbound targets four to eight-year-olds who enjoy stories about a little lion learning about bravery. With potentially frightening scenes of baboons trapping a little girl and lions scaring them away, it would best be read out loud to beginner readers. The colorful and detailed illustrations grace both sides of the pages with an easy-to-read font. After an ownership and dedication page with a Bible verse, the story ends with a note to parents and short prayer.

Young lioness Lizzy wishes she was grown up like others in the pride. She loves to play and frolic but is frustrated having to obey rules being so small. When she falls out of a tree and meets a little girl and her mother, she realizes she has something in common with the child. One day she sees baboons encircle the girl; the child prays to God for help. Knowing the lion is too little to approach the baboons, she runs to the pride and asks for help. Her father and other lions chase the baboons away, and the girl thanks Lizzy for answering her prayer. The lioness is praised for being brave by coming and getting help instead of trying to take on the challenge herself.

~ Why ~
This book is ideal for young ones who are timid or unsure of themselves as it reminds them that God is there for us all the time and sometimes going to adults or others for help is the best answer. I like the frog depicted throughout the story that follows Lizzy and the expressive artwork.

~ Why Not ~
Some readers may not care for books about lions or be fearful that they and baboons can attack others. Beginner readers may struggle with some of the tw0- and three-syllable words.

~ Wish ~
Lions and baboons living in their natural habitat have to be violent to survive. The story has the mother and child walking around unprotected, so it may give some children a false sense of security when around the predators.

~ Want ~
If you are looking for a brief tale about learning that bravery is more than standing up for oneself but also asking for help from others, this is a good starting point.

Thanks to BookLook Bloggers for this complimentary book that I am evaluating by choice.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

 

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Filed under **** Good - Will Be Glad to Pass On to Others, Animals / Pets, Book Review, Childrens, Christian

One Christmas Bear

One Christmas BearTitle: One Christmas Bear
Author & Illustrator: Anne Vittur Kennedy
Publisher: Tommy Nelson
ISBN: 978-0-7180-9014-2

“Little acts of kindness, our friends and families dear,
Merry time together – gifts from God to last all year!”
Anne Vittur Kennedy ends her children’s book, One Christmas Bear.

~ What ~
At twenty pages, this cut-out board book with sparkles on its front cover targets children ages three to six years old. With no scary scenes, it is a nice story about counting animals at Christmastime. Full page color illustrations of the animals in the snow cover the pages.

Written in four-lines of rhyme with some complicated wording that cover two open pages, this story begins with an adorable polar bear finding a friendly pup on Christmas day. As the reader turns the pages, the counting of animals and birds frolicking in the snow goes up to ten, including mice, foxes, squirrels, rabbits, eagles, snowmen, caribou, ginger cookies, owls, candy canes, snowballs, sledders, skaters, stockings, parents, stars, and friends. The scenes are charming and expressive as they show the bear and his friends enjoying the holiday.

~Why ~
Having grandchildren, I like how this book is the type to cuddle up with them on a cold winter’s Christmas day as we look at the animals playing in the snow. With page numbers on the bottom right side the pages, the book helps young ones learn to count as they search for objects in the illustrations. With the repetition, it is an educational tool that will delight kids.

~ Why Not ~
Those who do not like books that mention God may not approve of this book, but He is mentioned only once at the end. The book has little to do with the birth of Christ, but it does mention Christmas trees, snacks, and stockings. Due to the two- and three-syllable wording, it should be read out loud to beginner readers.

~ Wish ~
I prefer a Christmas book that promotes Jesus’s birth, but the animals depicted in this one are cute.

~ Want ~
If you are looking for a book to read during the holidays when it is cold or snowing outside, this is a good selection, but be aware it does not mention the main reason we celebrate Christmas.

Thanks to Book Look Bloggers for furnishing this complimentary book that I am freely reviewing.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Filed under **** Good - Will Be Glad to Pass On to Others, Book Review, Childrens, Christian

Captain Snout and the Super Power Questions

Captain Snout and the Super Power Questions: Don't Let the ANTs Steal Your HappinessTitle: Captain Snout and the Super Power Questions
Author: Daniel G. Amen, M.D.
Illustrator: Brendan Kearney
Publisher: Zonderkidz
ISBN: 978-0-310-75832-7

“Don’t surrender to this bad ANT! Challenge it with your Super Power Questions,” Captain Snout suggests in Daniel G. Amen’s children’s book, Captain Snout and the Super Power Questions: Don’t Let the ANTs Steal Your Happiness.

~ What ~
At forty pages, this oversized hardbound with a front cover targets children ages four to eight years old. With no scary scenes, it is a story about a superhero anteater who helps children overcome negativity and disappointment and to look at the brighter, happier side of situations. Containing some complicated wording, it would be best read out loud to beginner readers.

When the Pennypepper children want a puppy, they decide to do a car wash to earn money to buy it. Later the car wash sales diminish, and the three children are discouraged, believing they will never get a puppy. Captain Snout comes to their rescue by explaining his automatic negative thoughts (ANT) theory. Naming the five types of ANTs, he advises ways to avoid the All or Nothing, Just the Bad, Fortune Teller, Mind Reader, and Blaming ants. This form of psychotherapy helps the children overcome their insecurities, anxieties, and frustrations.

~Why ~
This is a charming tale of an anteater and ants for those who understand how life is not always cheerful and happy as they work through daily challenges. I like how an anteater is a hero who helps the children change their negativity into truer and happier thoughts to accomplish their goal.

~ Why Not ~
The story has a happily-ever-after ending so may not mimic real life situations when a child is going through a crisis or problem; however, changing one’s perspective into a positive will help some situations. There are some who may find the large eyes of every character being the focal point in the illustrations, distracting them from the meaning of the story. A few may wonder why the anteater did not simply eat up the ants to get rid of them.

~ Wish ~
With the book concentrating on changing a mindset from negative to positive regarding a situation, it would be helpful if it added how praying and depending on God can help the most. Although I understand and respect the author’s techniques completely, I noticed the book is from a Christian-based publisher so expected a Biblical aspect to its contents.

~ Want ~
If you are looking for a psychotherapeutic book for children on positive thinking, this may be a good selection for you, but I assumed more from a Christian publisher.

Thanks to Z-Blog Squad for furnishing this complimentary book that I am freely reviewing.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Filed under *** OK - Don't Love It, Don't Hate It, Book Review, Childrens

God Loves Me: My First Bible

God Loves Me, My First BibleTitle: God Loves Me
Author: Susan Elizabeth Beck
Illustrator: Lisa Mallett
Publisher: Zonderkidz
ISBN: 978-0-310-75931-7

“It’s never too early for little ones to learn that ‘God loves me!’” states the back cover of Susan Elizabeth Beck’s children’s book, God Loves Me: My First Bible.

~ What ~
This unnumbered thirty-four-page board book with a padded front cover that includes glitter targets preschool-age to third-grade children who want a beginner’s Bible. Containing sixteen stories rewritten in rhyme from the Old and New Testaments, there are corresponding full-colored, fanciful illustrations. It would best be read out loud to beginner readers due to some of the complicated three syllable words.

After an ownership page, each short story covers two open pages with a title in bold and four rhyming lines with an ending about God’s love. With eight from each testament, the stories range from Adam and Eve, Joseph, Samuel, and Esther to Mary, the twelve disciples, little children, and the risen Jesus to name a few.

~ Why ~
I like that each story is short and to the point in rhyme so they can be memorized by a young child while providing the opportunity to discuss them further in detail. Including the “God loved …” ending to each reinforces to a little one that God is love and loves each of us. The pictures have enough detail to keep a child’s attention.

~ Why Not ~
Those who do not believe in God and His Son may not be interested a book of Bible stories. Others may be concerned that the shortened stories do not exactly retell those in the Word of God, but they are concise. Some may be concerned regarding Daniel and the lions and Jesus dying on the cross, but there are no vivid pictures depicting the violent circumstances.

~ Wish ~
I prefer all pronouns of God capitalized for reverence.

~ Want ~
If you are looking for a children’s book that has shortened Bible stories told in rhyme with engaging illustrations, this is a good choice.

Thanks to Z-blog Squad for this complimentary book that I am freely evaluating.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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I’m Not a Scaredy Cat

Title: I’m Not a Scaredy Cat
Author: Max Lucado
Illustrator:  Shirley Ng-Benitez
Publisher: Tommy Nelson
ISBN: 978-0-7180-7491-3

“I’m a big cat. I’m a strong cat. I’m not a scaredy-cat … except when:” Max Lucado writes in his children’s book, I’m Not a Scaredy Cat: A Prayer for When You Wish You Were Brave.

~ What ~
This thirty-two-page oversized hardbound targets six to ten-year-olds who enjoy stories about overcoming fear by trusting in God. With no blatantly scary scenes, it would best be read out loud to beginner readers. The bright and expressive illustrations of a cat cover both sides of the pages with an easy-to-read font.

In this short story, a skittish cat is afraid of anything from a squeaking rubber ducky, loud marching band, cabana monkey, leaves falling, and a slippery slide to an elephant at the zoo sneezing, a creeping caterpillar, donut sprinkles, ticking clock, or the splashing rain. By saying a quick prayer to God that acknowledges He is nearby, the feline fears diminish, and he feels brave and reassured.

~ Why ~
This is a charming tale about relying on God when frightened. I like how cat faces its fears and calls on God when afraid. The drawings are descriptive and expressive.

~ Why Not ~
Some readers may not care for books about being afraid. Beginner readers may struggle with some of the two- and three-syllable words.

~ Wish ~
I hope sensitive or extremely emotional children do not acerbate their fears by learning of other concepts or ideas to fear by reading this book.

~ Want ~
If you are looking for a short, happy read about a fearful cat depending on God, this is a keeper.

Thanks to BookLook Bloggers for this complimentary book that I am evaluating by choice.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

 

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Filed under ***** Great - A Keeper, If You Borrow It, Give It Back!, Book Review, Childrens, Christian

5-Minute Bible: 100 Stories & 100 Songs

Title: 5-Minute Bible: 100 Stories & 100 Songs
Creator: Stephen Elkins
Illustrator: Tim O’Connor
Publisher: Tommy Nelson
ISBN: 978-0-7180-9764-6

“Each Bible story is written in a kid-friendly style and includes takeaway statements that will help little ones understand and remember God’s truth,” the letter to parents states in Stephen Elkins’s book, 5-Minute Bible: 100 Stories & 100 Songs.

~ What ~
This two-hundred-and-eight-page oversized hardbound with a padded front cover targets children ages four to eight years old who are looking for quick Bible stories with songs that can be read in five minutes or less. With expressive colored-penciled illustrations, the beginning has an ownership page to fill out, table of contents, and letter to parents, followed by a hundred stories from the Bible that includes a corresponding song,

Containing forty-seven stories from the Old Testament and fifty-three from the New Testament, the left side of the page references the Bible verses under its title with a couple of paragraphs about the story under it and a statement below as well as a short application for the reader. The right side of the page includes a short song; some are one or two stanzas of a well-known tune or adaptation of it with artwork below it.

~ Why ~
Many young children love to read or be read a Bible story at bedtime. I enjoy the briefness of the stories that many young ones will understand. Most of the songs are familiar to sing if you have gone to Sunday school or church. The stories are told simply but contain enough facts to understand and comprehend. I appreciate adding a brief takeaway statement.

~ Why Not ~
For those who want nothing to do with learning about God and the Bible, this would not be a good choice. Although there is no explanation of Mary’s virginity, the plan of eternal salvation of Jesus dying on the cross for our sins and rising again is mentioned. Some young ones may be frightened seeing depictions of angry Goliath and Daniel’s friends in the fire, but there is no view of Christ hanging on the cross.

~ Wish ~
With the layout and content of this book, it is educational as is and needs no suggested improvements. One idea might be to include Bible verse and song indexes alphabetically at the end.

~ Want ~
If your preschooler to early elementary school age child wants to read or be read Bible stories at bedtime and sing a simple song, this will make the perfect addition to his or her bookcase.

Thanks to Book Look Bloggers for furnishing this complimentary book that I am under no obligation to review.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Filed under ***** Great - A Keeper, If You Borrow It, Give It Back!, Book Review, Childrens, Christian

Gobi: A Little Dog with a Big Heart

Title: Gobi: A Little Dog with A Big Heart
Author: Dion Leonard
Illustrator:  Lisa Manuzak
Publisher: Tommy Nelson
ISBN: 978-0-7180-7529-3

Maybe you will be my forever friend, Gobi thought as she nuzzled Dion and drifted off to sleep,” Dion Leonard writes in his children’s book Gobi: A Little Dog with A Big Heart.

~ What ~
This thirty-two-page oversized hardbound targets four to eight-year-olds who enjoy stories about a dog finding a friend. With no scary scenes, it would best be read out loud to beginner readers. The bright and bold illustrations grace both sides of the pages with an easy-to-read font.

Based on a true story, Gobi is a scrappy dog living in the desert. When he sees a group of runners, he follows them, hoping to make new friends. The dog befriends Dion, one of the runners in the race who is determined to focus on winning. When the man backtracks to get his faithful follower, the canine knows he has a forever friend.

~ Why ~
This is a charming tale about finding and keeping a friendship. I like how the dog seeks out the runner and sticks close to him, waiting for a sign of acceptance from the man. The drawings are descriptive and expressive.

~ Why Not ~
Some readers may not care for books about dogs. Beginner readers may struggle with some of the tw0- and three-syllable words.

~ Wish ~
Although the book does show the love between a man and his best friend, it does not show a young child the responsibility of having a pet dog.

~ Want ~
If you are looking for a short, happy read about a dog who finds a lifetime friend, this is a keeper.

Thanks to BookLook Bloggers for this complimentary book that I am evaluating by choice.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Filed under ***** Great - A Keeper, If You Borrow It, Give It Back!, Animals / Pets, Biography, Childrens, Fiction

Moana – The Beat of Your Heart

Moana - The Beat of Your Heart: A Musical Exploration Activity Book Disney LearningTitle: Moana – The Beat of Your Heart: A Musical Exploration Activity Book
Publisher: Hal Leonard
ISBN: 978-1-4950-6479-1

“You can play the drum like Moana, but first you must feel the beat,” it states in the children’s book, Moana – The Beat of Your Heart: A Musical Exploration Activity Book.

~ What ~
Part of the Disney Learning series, this numbered thirty-two-page oversized hardbound targets children ages four to eight years old who enjoy books regarding stories about Moana and making music. With no scary scenes, it may be best read out loud to beginner readers due to some complicated wording.

In this short book that does not contain the entire story of Moana but a tribute to the girl who feels the musical beat, there are more than a dozen activities to make or do regarding music. The reader learns a little about Moana and her family and friends as they feel the traditional rhythms of their island. The reader can experience the beat through clapping and movements. Instructions on how to make and play a lali, fala, pahu, fa’atete, and drums are included. The ending has a recap of what is learned and a song as well as a note to parents and online read and sing-along links.

~ Why ~
This is a thoughtful book that blends the Disney character Moana with the element of playing musical instruments. By following directions, our four-year-old granddaughter can create and make sounds with everyday household items such as boxes, newspaper, placemats, buckets, and wooden spoons. Older children will appreciate designing the instruments and experimenting with them.

~ Why Not ~
Those who do not care about making music may not appreciate this read that encourages it. Others may find there are too many two and three syllable words that young readers may have trouble deciphering. Some may not like the commercialism the themed book promotes or the repetitive symbols.

~ Wish ~
I found this book a little too complicated for the younger children and perhaps sophomoric for the older ones. I wish the book included a CD instead so one does not have to go online to read or sing along. Having a QSR code for a smartphone might be helpful.

~ Want ~
If you are looking for a fun gift to give a child who loves Moana and music, this may be a viable option that teaches how to feel the musical beat.

Thanks to Bookpleasures for this complimentary book that I am freely evaluating.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Filed under **** Good - Will Be Glad to Pass On to Others, Book Review, Childrens