** CONTEST ** THE PRACTICAL PREPPER ~ Free Book Giveaway!

Win Kylene & Jonathan Jones’s
THE PRACTICAL PREPPER!
ENTER TO WIN THE BOOK.

ONE WINNER will be randomly selected to win FREE from Cedar Fort this recently-released book.

Book teaser: “Current world events are prompting many individuals to prepare now. While prepping is important, we recommend that you always strive to keep balance in your life,” Kylene and Jonathan Jones remind readers in their book, The Practical Prepper: A Common-Sense Guide to Preparing for Emergencies.

SIMPLE steps to enter this 3-day contest

1.  Follow my blog if you do not do so already.
2. Click on the headline ** CONTEST ** to be sure you are on the Reply page.
3. Post in the “LEAVE A REPLY” section below why you want to read this exciting book (could be funny, clever, serious, or the words “I want” since the winner is randomly chosen).
4. Like either one of these Cedar Fort sites on Facebook:

https://www.facebook.com/cedarfortbooks

5. If you are the winner, please consider posting a review regarding what you thought of the book on one or two websites.

This is a FAST CONTEST ending FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24th @ 5 PM PST so follow the requirements above and try for a chance to win a book that is mailed from the publisher directly to you! Winner’s shipping address must be in the U.S.A.

I read & reviewed this book – it’s a 4 STAR!
Here is my review: http://connywithay.wordpress.com/2014/10/17/the-practical-prepper/

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Eat

Title: Eat: The Little Book of Fast Food
Author: Nigel Slater
Photographer: Jonathan Lovekin
Publisher: Ten Speed Press
ISBN: 978-1-60774-726-0

“We are not chasing perfection here. This is simply a collection of suggestions for something you might like to make for dinner. Just straightforward, delicious cooking. For the times we just want to eat,” Nigel Slater writes in the introduction of his cookbook, Eat: The Little Book of Fast Food.

At four hundred and sixty-four pages, this canvas-covered paperback targets those interested in quick and simple cooking with potentially marvelously tasting results. Photographer Lovekin’s small color photographs of every dish are located on the top right side of the book, with sometimes full-page pictures on the left.

After a helpful quick guide by main ingredient, acknowledgements, and a short introduction, over four hundred pages present simple-to-make recipes. An extensive index, alphabetized by ingredient name, completes the book.

Different than the standardized cookbook that lists ingredients with their needed quantities and serving size, this American version is set up in paragraph format, highlighting important information. With no caloric data or total preparation time noted, its format does not allow for the quick “do we have all the ingredients” glance.

The name of the recipe is on the right side of the page by its small photograph with one or two lines of main ingredients. Not using any bulletin or numbered system, usually the entire directions are on one page, with alternate ideas mentioned on the left side. Serving size and a short description end the instructions.

With almost six hundred recipe options, there are eleven sections related to food eaten by hand, made in a bowl or frying pan, cooked on the grill or stove, in stew format or oven, under a crust, in a wok, on a plate, or as a dessert.

Having a more eclectic collection, recipes include concoctions such as duck burgers, carrot and bulgur porridge, goat cheese frittata, lentil bolognaise, citrus chile grilled chicken, ham and kale colcannon, lamb with asparagus, bacon boulangere, crab mac and cheese, salt and pepper pork, peas and ham, and banana cheesecake to name a few.

Although the thick book cannot easily be laid flat and the paragraph format may cause more time involve searching for information, the selections of recipes are varied, interesting, and supposedly easy to make for the novice cook to the experienced chef.

Thanks to Blogging for Books for furnishing this complimentary book in exchange for a review of the reader’s honest opinion.

 

This review will be posted on Blogging for Books, DeeperShopping, and Amazon with links on Bookfun.org, Godinterest, Pinterest, and LinkedIn.
GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Filed under **** Good Read - Will Be Glad to Pass On to Others, Home / Garden / Food

The Diaries of Robin’s Toys

Title: The Diaries of Robin’s Toys
Authors: Ken and Angie Lake
Illustrators: Vishnu Madhav and Joyson Loitongbam
Publisher: Sweet Cherry Publishing
ISBN: 978-1-78226-022-6

“Little toy, hear this rhyme,
Let it take you back in time,
Tales of sadness or of glory,
Little toy, reveal your story.”
Robin’s grandpa casts his magic spell on the toys in Ken and Angie Lake’s series, The Diaries of Robin’s Toys.

Targeted toward preschool to middle school aged children, this series contains ten small ninety-six page paperbacks in a sturdy cardboard holder. With no scary or violent scenes, each story is ideal to be read out loud to beginner readers due to some complicated words. Having different punctuation, capitalization, and spelling rules in the United Kingdom, the format may confuse American readers. Written on notebook-looking lined paper with easy-to-read font, the black and white illustrations by Madhav and Loitongbam are simplistic yet understandable.

All ten tales are similar in format, offering a story of a young boy named Robin who is compassionate and observant of others. Every story has his grandad taking him to a car boot sale (similar to a swap meet in America), where the young boy is allowed to pick out a toy. After Robin selects the item, Grandad casts a special spell on it, knowing it has an interesting story to tell.

Throughout the stories, Grandad always buys Grandma special gifts too, giving different responses each time when given them. She always has a special dessert to offer the two.

The toys include a bee, cow, cod, donkey, camel, rabbit, gorilla and his pet dog, lion, giraffe, and reindeer. When the magic spells are cast upon them, they always give information about themselves, where they live, what they eat, et cetera.

Each toy tells a story of how it learned a lesson. It could be about working together as a team, reaching out to others, not hanging with the wrong crowd, having humility, or learning to adapt to others’ personalities.

At the end of each yarn, Robin learns a lesson from the animal that can be shared with the person initially mentioned in the book’s beginning, ranging from kindness and thoughtfulness to friendship and not making fun of someone.

By teaching children values and morals, this book not only focuses on respecting others, it provides information on animals that is fun and interesting. Children will enjoy reading how a toy’s story reveals engaging educational information while teaching an important lesson. With two books rated three of five stars and a silly one a five, the four-star rating for the series is aptly given.

Thanks to the publisher and Bookpleasures for furnishing this complimentary book in exchange for a review of the reader’s honest opinion.

 

This review will be posted on Bookpleasures and Amazon with links on Bookfun.org, Godinterest, Pinterest, and LinkedIn.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Filed under **** Good Read - Will Be Glad to Pass On to Others, Animals / Pets, Childrens

Roger the Reindeer

Title: Roger the Reindeer (The Diaries of Robin’s Toys)
Authors: Ken and Angie Lake
Illustrators: Vishnu Madhav and Joyson Loitongbam
Publisher: Sweet Cherry Publishing
ISBN: 978-1-78226-030-1

“Little toy, hear this rhyme,
Let it take you back in time,
Tales of sadness or of glory,
Little toy, reveal your story.”
Robin’s grandpa casts his magic spell on the toy in Ken and Angie Lake’s story, Roger the Reindeer.

Targeted toward preschool to middle school aged children, this small paperback is part of “The Diaries of Robin’s Toys” ten-book series. With no scary or violent scenes, it is ideal to be read out loud to beginner readers due to some complicated words. Having different punctuation, capitalization, and spelling rules in the United Kingdom, the format may confuse American readers. Written on notebook-looking lined paper with easy-to-read font, the black and white illustrations by Madhav and Loitongbam are simplistic yet understandable.

In this Christmas tale, Robin thinks about the new girl at school named Alicia, who was from Italy and refused to learn English during class. Apparently she was homesick and missed her friends.

Later, Grandad takes Robin to the car boot sale (similar to a swap meet in America), where the young boy is allowed to pick out a toy. Robin selects a toy reindeer. Grandad casts a special spell on it, knowing it has an interesting story to tell.

The reindeer first tells a silly joke, adding that his name is Roger and he is from the Arctic. He mentions North American reindeer are called caribou and all in their breed have antlers. He says they are known for pulling Santa’s sleigh.

Roger tells his story of not liking the freezing weather so he decides to leave his home in Lapland where he ate only moss in search of a sunnier area. Often making mistakes, he does not get to taste real food because he cannot read labels so eats cardboard, plastic, and bitter rhubarb. Only when he takes a class on reading does Roger get chosen to pull Santa’s sleigh.

Learning from the reindeer, Robin recognizes how important reading is so he helps Alicia learn to read and they write Christmas cards to classmates.

By teaching the importance of reading, this book not only focuses on encouraging others, it provides information on reindeer, especially if Santa is a part of the reader’s Christmas traditions. Children will enjoy reading how a toy’s story reveals engaging educational information while teaching an important lesson.

Thanks to the publisher and Bookpleasures for furnishing this complimentary book in exchange for a review of the reader’s honest opinion.

 

This review will be posted on Bookpleasures and Amazon with links on Pinterest and LinkedIn.
GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Filed under *** OK Read - Don't Hate It, Don't Love It, Animals / Pets, Childrens

Geraldo the Giraffe

Title: Geraldo the Giraffe (The Diaries of Robin’s Toys)
Authors: Ken and Angie Lake
Illustrators: Vishnu Madhav and Joyson Loitongbam
Publisher: Sweet Cherry Publishing
ISBN: 978-1-78226-022-6

“Little toy, hear this rhyme,
Let it take you back in time,
Tales of sadness or of glory,
Little toy, reveal your story.”
Robin’s grandpa casts his magic spell on the toy in Ken and Angie Lake’s story, Geraldo the Giraffe.

Targeted toward preschool to middle school aged children, this small paperback is part of “The Diaries of Robin’s Toys” ten-book series. With no scary or violent scenes, it is ideal to be read out loud to beginner readers due to some complicated words. Having different punctuation, capitalization, and spelling rules in the United Kingdom, the format may confuse American readers. Written on notebook-looking lined paper with easy-to-read font, the black and white illustrations by Madhav and Loitongbam are simplistic yet understandable.

In this tale, Robin was thinking about Caroline, a girl in his class who is overweight mainly because she does not eat healthy foods. Due to her appearance, she is often bullied at school.

Later that day, Grandad takes Robin to the car boot sale (similar to a swap meet in America), where the young boy is allowed to pick out a toy. He selects a toy giraffe. Grandad casts a special spell on it, knowing it has an interesting story to tell.

The giraffe says his name is Geraldo, and Robin asks why he was told he is an extra-special gourmet giraffe. The giraffe first tells them his breed usually is found on the plains of Africa in herds, and they eat leaves.

Geraldo explains he seems always to be hungry so he purchased a cookbook and started making the recipes. He began with scrambled eggs and progressed to tarts, curry, pies, trifles, and custard. Eating everything he made, he gained so much weight his feet could no longer reach the ground. He learned a lesson, lost the weight, and never abused eating again.

Learning from the giraffe, Robin recognizes that Caroline had been picked on by others so he became her friend. He invited her over for a healthy meal, which she loved. The girl changed her eating habits and started to exercise, losing extra pounds.

By teaching not to make fun of others, this book not only focuses on encouraging others, it provides information on giraffes that is fun and interesting. Children will enjoy reading how a toy’s story reveals engaging educational information while teaching an important lesson.

Thanks to the publisher and Bookpleasures for furnishing this complimentary book in exchange for a review of the reader’s honest opinion.

 

This review will be posted on Bookpleasures and DeeperShopping with links on Godinterest, Pinterest, and LinkedIn.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Filed under **** Good Read - Will Be Glad to Pass On to Others, Animals / Pets, Childrens

** CONTEST ** WELL SEASONED by Becky Wilson ~ Book Giveaway!

 

Win Rebecca Webb Wilson’s
WELL SEASONED: SAVORING LIFE’S LESSONS
ENTER TO WIN THE BOOK.

One winner will be randomly selected to win FREE this recently-released book.

Book teaser: “Open your mind to the beauty before you in the photographs you see and in the words you read. Open your mind to picturing your life in a new way, one that instills hope regardless of the season of the year or the season of your life,” Rebecca Webb Wilson writes in the introduction of her book, Well Seasoned: Savoring Life’s Lessons.

SIMPLE steps to enter this 3-day contest

1.  Follow my blog if you do not do so already.
2. Click on the headline ** CONTEST ** to be sure you are on the Reply page.
3. Post in the “LEAVE A REPLY” section below why you want to read this exciting book (could be funny, clever, serious, or the words “I want” since the winner is randomly chosen).
4. Like this social media site:

https://www.facebook.com/becky.wilson.142240?fref=ts&ref=br_tf

5. If you are the winner, please consider posting a review regarding what you thought of the book on one or two websites.

This is a FAST CONTEST ending WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22nd @ 5 PM PST so follow the requirements above and try for a chance to win a book that is mailed from the publisher directly to you! Winner’s shipping address must be in the U.S.A.

I read & reviewed this book – it’s a 4 STAR!
Here is my review: http://connywithay.wordpress.com/2014/10/10/well-seasoned-savoring-lifes-lessons/

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Filed under Win-A-Free-Book Contests

Leon the Lion

Leon the Lion (The Diaries of Robins Toys)Title: Leon the Lion (The Diaries of Robin’s Toys)
Authors: Ken and Angie Lake
Illustrators: Vishnu Madhav and Joyson Loitongbam
Publisher: Sweet Cherry Publishing
ISBN: 978-1-78226-028-8

“Little toy, hear this rhyme,
Let it take you back in time,
Tales of sadness or of glory,
Little toy, reveal your story.”
Robin’s grandpa casts his magic spell on the toy in Ken and Angie Lake’s story, Leon the Lion.

Targeted toward preschool to middle school aged children, this small paperback is part of “The Diaries of Robin’s Toys” ten-book series. With no scary or violent scenes, it is ideal to be read out loud to beginner readers due to some complicated words. Having different punctuation, capitalization, and spelling rules in the United Kingdom, the format may confuse American readers. Written on notebook-looking lined paper with easy-to-read font, the black and white illustrations by Madhav and Loitongbam are simplistic yet understandable.

In this comprehensive tale, Robin is upset that the new kid, JP, did not help their football team win the last game. Overhearing JP’s mom talk to the coach, he hears the boy has no friends and loves learning about nature.

Taking his mind off the matter, Grandad stops by and takes him to the car boot sale (similar to a swap meet in America), where the young boy is allowed to pick out a toy. Robin picks out a toy lion. Grandad casts a special spell on it, knowing it has an interesting story to tell.

The cheerful lion says his name is Leon and that he is not the biggest of cats. He tells them lions come from Africa, Asia, and sometimes India and are carnivores that like to hunt at night and sleep during the day.

Leon tells the story that he is a shy, gentle poetry-writing critter who could not get a job as a security guard, sales person, or babysitter because everyone was afraid of his kind. He ends up happily working writing advertisements for a radio station and becomes known as the “King of the Jingle.”

Learning from the lion, Robin recognizes that JP may not be athletic, but he is very knowledgeable when it comes to nature, especially when he names a unique ingredient in Grandma’s trifle.

By teaching not to prejudge, this book not only focuses on promoting the positive in others, it provides information on lions that is fun and interesting. Children will enjoy reading how a toy’s story reveals engaging educational information while teaching an important lesson.

Thanks to the publisher and Bookpleasures for furnishing this complimentary book in exchange for a review of the reader’s honest opinion.

 

This review will be posted on Bookpleasures and Amazon with links on Godinterest, Pinterest, and LinkedIn.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Filed under **** Good Read - Will Be Glad to Pass On to Others, Animals / Pets, Childrens

Running Lean

Title: Running Lean
Author: Diana L. Sharples
Publisher: Blink
ISBN: 978-0-31—73497-0

“I can’t watch you kill yourself to be skinny. Besides, you’re not fat. Since I’ve known you, you’ve never been fat. I loved the way you looked when I met you, and I love you now,” Calvin confesses to Stacey in Diana L. Sharples’s book, Running Lean.

This four hundred page paperback targets mainly young adults, especially high school teenagers. With no profanity, the topics of under-aged drinking, fondling, premarital sex, and anorexia may not be apropos for immature readers. Acknowledgements, discussion questions, and the publisher’s advertisements complete the book. This reviewer wishes all pronouns of God were capitalized for reverence.

In this young adult romance, sixteen year old Stacey is madly in love with Calvin and visa versa. When Calvin’s brother, Michael, died serving his country, the artsy and creative girl was there for him, listening, loving, and not judging his actions and emotions.

Convinced by her eclectic, charismatic friend, Zoe, that she needs to go on a diet, Stacey hides her aversion to food, but Calvin senses something is amiss in their high-school relationship. Working on his brother’s old Yamaha motorcycle that has problems running lean, the young man is determined to fix both the bike and his girlfriend’s problems.

As Stacey conceals every calorie consumed, Calvin not only notices her thinness and health issues, he sees her changing personality and her moods swing from tender to melodramatic, accusing him of being interested in one of his best friends. As another close friend tells him Stacey has a body-image problem and controls their relationship, he does not know Zoe is promoting further dieting, while trying to break up their relationship with her negativity.

Wanting to help his girlfriend, Calvin tries to talk to her about her anorexia but she refuses his intervention until medical issues take over her body. Thinking God does not listen to him, Calvin must rely on Him for direction to uncover her healing.

Although the book focuses on first love between two inexperienced young adults that recently received their drivers’ licenses, the topic of anorexia and its deadly symptoms is important to any age-bracket reader who may be facing the same situation. With sporadic inputs of having a personal relationship with Christ, the book lacks in spiritual depth but may be acceptable as a teen read.

Thanks to The Book Club Network Inc. for furnishing this complimentary book in exchange for a review based on the reader’s honest opinions.

 

This review will be posted on The Book Club Network, DeeperShopping, and Amazon with links on Bookfun.org, Godinterest, Pinterest, and LinkedIn.

GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Filed under **** Good Read - Will Be Glad to Pass On to Others, Christian, Fiction

Gavin the Gorilla and Snuffles

Title: Gavin the Gorilla and Snuffles (The Diaries of Robin’s Toys)
Authors: Ken and Angie Lake
Illustrators: Vishnu Madhav and Joyson Loitongbam
Publisher: Sweet Cherry Publishing
ISBN: 978-1-78226-029-5

“Little toy, hear this rhyme,
Let it take you back in time,
Tales of sadness or of glory,
Little toy, reveal your story.”
Robin’s grandpa casts his magic spell on the toy in Ken and Angie Lake’s story, Gavin the Gorilla and Snuffles.

Targeted toward preschool to middle school aged children, this small paperback is part of “The Diaries of Robin’s Toys” ten-book series. With no scary or violent scenes, it is ideal to be read out loud to beginner readers due to some complicated words. Having different punctuation, capitalization, and spelling rules in the United Kingdom, the format may confuse American readers. Written on notebook-looking lined paper with easy-to-read font, the black and white illustrations by Madhav and Loitongbam are simplistic yet understandable.

In this wordy tale, Robin notices the new student at school. Feeling bad that the boy is being bullied, he invites thin, shy Mark to his house where he learns the kid is superb at cricket.

Later Grandad stops by and takes Robin to the car boot sale (similar to a swap meet in America), where he is allowed to pick out a toy. Robin picks out a toy gorilla and his little dog. Grandad casts a special spell on them, knowing they have an interesting story to tell.

At first, the frightened Gavin the gorilla and his protective dog named Snuffles question if Robin and Grandad are friendly. Warming up to them, Gavin explains he is the largest of primates and originally from central Africa. Sometimes called Mountain gorillas, his breed are herbivores.

Gavin says he lived in a safari park and wanted to be a veterinarian, but all animals were afraid of him so he joined the circus. When he witnessed an accident, he became friends with Snuffles, who always stood up for him. Gavin was sent back to the safari park where he saved a baby antelope and Snuffles told everyone how kind he was.

Learning from the gorilla and little dog, Robin recognizes that Mark is an excellent cricket player and picks him first to be on his team at school. The other children learn about the boy’s skills and befriend him.

By teaching not to prejudge others, this book not only focuses on helping others, it provides information on gorillas that is fun and interesting. Children will enjoy reading how a toy’s story reveals engaging educational information while teaching an important lesson.

Thanks to the publisher and Bookpleasures for furnishing this complimentary book in exchange for a review of the reader’s honest opinion.

 

This review will be posted on Bookpleasures and Amazon with links on Bookfun.org, Godinterest,  Pinterest, and LinkedIn.
GRAMMARLY was used to check for errors in this review.

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Filed under **** Good Read - Will Be Glad to Pass On to Others, Animals / Pets, Childrens

** CONTEST ** CHASING 120 by Monte Wolverton ~ Book Giveaway!

Win Monte Wolverton’s CHASING 120!
ENTER TO WIN THE BOOK.

ONE WINNER will be randomly selected to win FREE from Plain Truth Ministries this recently-released book.

Book teaser“Health, he said, was a matter of obedience to a set of laws he had discovered in the Bible. Once you understood and obeyed those laws, you could claim the promise found in Genesis 6:3 and live a vigorous, robust life until the age of 120,” Dr. Belknap promotes in Monte Wolverton’s novel, Chasing 120: A Story of Food, Faith, Fraud and the Pursuit of Longevity.

SIMPLE steps to enter this 3-day contest

1.  Follow my blog if you do not do so already.
2. Click on the headline ** CONTEST ** to be sure you are on the Reply page.
3. Post in the “LEAVE A REPLY” section below why you want to read this exciting book (could be funny, clever, serious, or the words “I want” since the winner is randomly chosen).
4. Like either one of these social media sites:

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1474109736162605/

https://twitter.com/Plain_Truth

Or buy the book here:

https://www.ptm.org/uni/resources/order/form_chasing120.php

5. If you are the winner, please consider posting a review regarding what you thought of the book on one or two websites.

This is a FAST CONTEST ending MONDAY, OCTOBER 20th @ 5 PM PST so follow the requirements above and try for a chance to win a book that is mailed from the publisher directly to you! Winner’s shipping address must be in the U.S.A.

I read & reviewed this book – it’s a 4 STAR!
Here is my review: http://connywithay.wordpress.com/2014/10/12/chasing-120/

 

2 Comments

Filed under Win-A-Free-Book Contests